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Writers' News

How to write a book: 11 tips on creating a bestseller from published authors

cosmopolitan.com – Monday May 14, 2018

While it's easy to romanticise writing a novel on the side, knowing how to actually write a book and where the F to start can be a little daunting. Here, 11 published authors, who will be at Hay Festival between 24 May - 3 June, share their tips and tricks for starting your next masterpiece. And who knows? It might end up being a bestseller.

[Read the full article]

Amazon Publishing launches non-fiction arm

thebookseller.com – Monday May 14, 2018

Amazon Publishing is breaking into non-fiction in the UK through imprint Little A.

The retailer's publishing arm has been “keen to explore quality non-fiction from UK authors for some time”, according to editorial director Laura Deacon, and is calling on agents to submit a broad range of titles ranging from history, science, lifestyle and popular culture. Agents The Bookseller spoke to have greeted the news with enthusiasm.

Amazon Publishing currently publishes fiction under four imprints in the UK: Thomas & Mercer, Lake Union Publishing, Montlake Romance and 47 North. In the US, Little A publishes literary fiction and non-fiction, but in the UK it will currently just focus on non-fiction.

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New Magazine Listing

firstwriter.com – Monday May 14, 2018

Publishes: Fiction; Nonfiction; Poetry; 
Markets: Adult; 
Preferred styles: Contemporary; Dark; Experimental; Light; Literary; Mainstream; Progressive; Traditional

An online journal. We gravitate towards work that is quirky, accessible, and unconventional. An ideal piece might cover a subject few people write about or cover familiar subjects from an unexpected angle.

[See the full listing]

What makes good writing good? It’s all in the ear

prospectmagazine.co.uk – Sunday May 13, 2018

Poetry, according to one definition, is “memorable speech.” That may be my favourite definition—because it addresses the original orality of the form. Even in free verse, it’s the sound that does much, perhaps most, of the real work and no explication of symbol and metaphor captures how a poem works if it ignores that. It’s for that reason that James Fenton’s 2002 An Introduction To English Poetry—with its attention to prosody—seems to me one of the best available.

Prose may be “memorable speech” too. As I found when researching my recent book on style and usage, neuroscience tells us that even when reading silently, we use the parts of the brain associated with hearing. That affirmed my conviction that, though prose cadence—being harder to talk about analytically than poetry—is little discussed, what we think of as “good writing” almost always seems so because it sounds right.

[Read the full article]

Elena Ferrante: ‘If you feel the urge to write, there’s no good reason to put it off’

theguardian.com – Saturday May 12, 2018

If you feel the need to write, you absolutely should write. Don’t trust those who say: I’m telling you for your own good, don’t waste time on that. The art of discouraging with kind words is among the most widely practised. Nor should you believe those who say: you’re young, you lack experience, wait. We shouldn’t put off writing until we’ve lived enough, read sufficiently, have a desk of our own in a room of our own with a garden overlooking the sea, have been through intense experiences, live in a stimulating city, retreat to a mountain hut, have had children, have travelled extensively.

Publishing, yes: that can certainly be put off; in fact, one can decide not to publish at all. But writing should in no case be postponed to an “after”. When writing is our way of being in the world, it continuously asserts itself over the countless other aspects of life: love, study, a job. It insists even when there’s no paper and pen or anything, because we’re worshippers of the written word and our minds dictate sentences even in the absence of tools with which to set them down. Writing, in short, is always there, urgent, and distances even the people we love, even our children who ask us to play.

[Read the full article]

New Literary Agency Listing

firstwriter.com – Friday May 11, 2018

Handles: Fiction
Areas include: Mystery; Romance; Thrillers; Women's Interests
Markets: Adult
Preferred styles: Commercial; Contemporary; Light; Mainstream; Niche; Popular; Progressive; Satirical; Serious; Traditional

A full-service boutique agency providing hands-on guidance throughout each and every part of the publishing pursuit. OTLA is single-minded and fully dedicated to getting you on the right track to launch your career or progress to the next level. From honing manuscripts to be their very best, to identifying the right market for placement, through contract advisement and negotiation, to crafting promotional campaigns to help grow your audience, the prime objective is to help you achieve your goals. Currently seeking completed works with vibrant, fresh voices in these genres: romance, women's fiction, mysteries, and young adult.

[See the full listing]

New Magazine Listing

firstwriter.com – Thursday May 10, 2018

Publishes: Fiction; Poetry; 
Areas include: Short Stories; 
Markets: Adult; 
Preferred styles: Literary

Annual student-edited literary magazine. Send 3-5 poems or short stories up to 1,500 words by post or by email. Submissions from contributors outside the university are considered between October and February each year.

[See the full listing]

How to banish cliches from your students’ creative writing

tes.com – Wednesday May 9, 2018

One of the most disenchanting moments when teaching creative writing must be coming across “he ran as fast as a cheetah” in a piece of writing. You know you have taught them appropriate comparisons; you know you have shown them examples from literary geniuses… so why is that blinking cheetah rearing its spotted head again?

The problem of stock similes and metaphors littering pupils’ writing is the bane of many an English teacher’s life. What can you do about it when it feels like you have already tried everything?

A technique I have used is "exploding" metaphors and similes. This forces students to consider their comparisons more carefully, and consequently makes them write with more detail. It can also lead them to consider the writer’s craft more carefully in general. And when they think like writers, it will always help their analysis.

[Read the full article]

New Literary Agency Listing

firstwriter.com – Wednesday May 9, 2018

Handles: Fiction; Nonfiction
Areas: Autobiography; Beauty and Fashion; Design; Entertainment; Health; Lifestyle; Psychology; Women's Interests
Markets: Adult; Children's; Youth

Specialises in nonfiction, but will also consider middle grade and young adult fiction. No history, spirituality, biography, screenplays, true crime, poetry, religion, picture books, or any other fiction besides middle grade and young adult. See website for full submission guidelines.

[See the full listing]

Daily Mail and PRH launch third £20k writers' competition

thebookseller.com – Tuesday May 8, 2018

The Daily Mail and Penguin Random House have launched the third year of their nationwide competition to search for a new writing talent.

The winner will receive a £20,000 advance and publishing contract with PRH imprint Century and the services of literary agent Luigi Bonomi.

Entrants are invited to submit the first 5,000 words of their novel, along with a 600-word synopsis. Submissions can be of any adult genre except for saga, science fiction and fantasy. Entrants must not have had a novel published before.

The competition will be judged by a panel of experts: author and TV presenter Fern Britton; Bonomi, managing director of LBA Literary Agents; crime writer Simon Kernick; the Daily Mail's literary editor Sandra Parsons; and Selina Walker, publisher for Century & Arrow.

[Read the full article]

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