Traditional Publishing

Writers' News

Writers Institute gives aspiring authors a Pathway to Publication – Friday December 8, 2017

Technological changes have rocked publishing over the last few years, creating new opportunities for authors. While some pursue the traditional path of placing a book with a publisher, others are distributing and promoting books themselves with a wide range of services. At the 2018 Writers’ Institute, the University of Wisconsin–Madison will help writers make sense of today’s confusing publishing landscape and find their own route to success.

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Easy listening – Friday December 8, 2017

Agents are on my mind. At last week’s AudioBook Revolution conference, a number of agents raised concerns about how publishers are demanding audio rights when they also buy print. The charge was led from the podium by Curtis Brown agent Alice Lutyens, backed from the floor by her colleague Cathryn Summerhayes, and informed by agent Ivan Mulcahy. It was a debate I had been told no-one wanted to have. Now it feels urgent.

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4 Literary Magazines Every Aspiring Writer Should Subscribe To – Thursday December 7, 2017

When you are an aspiring writer, it is always important to develop your craft as the years progress. You want your writing to grow with you. Helping your writing grow could mean you spend a lot of time writing, or you have majored in the field at your chosen college.

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New Literary Agency Listing – Thursday December 7, 2017

Handles: Fiction; Nonfiction
Markets: Children's; Youth

Focuses on children's books and digital content for all ages and genres. Send query by email. See website for full guidelines.

[See the full listing]

How to get published if you’re not in the know – Wednesday December 6, 2017

Everyone who works in publishing will be familiar with the phone call in which you are asked to advise a friend or friend-of-a-friend about a book they have just written. Some people might pretend to roll their eyes or grumble a little, but it is, to be honest, one of the most gratifying of moments. We all know it. Finally, you can be of some actual use to all the people with real jobs who were always happy to offer you practical help over the years when you were reading things.

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New Magazine Listing – Tuesday December 5, 2017

Publishes: Fiction; Poetry; 
Areas include: Short Stories; 
Markets: Adult; 
Preferred styles: Literary

East Anglian literary magazine published biannually, with one themed and one non-themed issue each year. Publishes poetry and short stories. See website for full guidelines and any current theme.

[See the full listing]

The bad sex award inspired me to work harder at writing good sex – Friday December 1, 2017

What makes a sex scene badly written? No doubt we all have our views on the specific offences that make us shudder. A glance at past offenders shortlisted for the Literary Review’s Bad Sex in Fiction award reminds me of some sins that I find personally unforgivable.

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How to get your novel published – according to a literary agent – Friday December 1, 2017

Former literary agent, and author of five novels (which have been published across the world in over 20 languages) Anna Davis shares some insider knowledge on how to get your manuscript published.

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Hachette UK buys Jessica Kingsley Publishers – Friday December 1, 2017

Thirty years after it was founded, Jessica Kingsley Publishers (JKP) has been bought by Hachette UK for an undisclosed sum.

The indie publisher specialising in social and mental health sciences is set to become an imprint of John Murray Press under Nick Davies. Its founder Jessica Kingsley will work with the company on a consultancy basis until mid-2018 when she will retire.

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How publishers are using augmented reality to bring stories to life – Wednesday November 29, 2017

Print sales might be on the rise, but that does not mean publishers are turning their backs on digital content altogether. 

While pop-up books used to be the only way to make reading an interactive experience, the rise of augmented reality means that publishers are now able to bring stories to life in a whole new way. 

But is there a demand for AR-driven books? And what are the benefits for the brands and publishers involved? Here’s more on the story, along with a few new and innovative examples.

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