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Writers' News

The Publishing Industry Relies On Midlist Authors

goodereader.com – Wednesday March 22, 2017

The publishing industry constantly bemoans the lack a true bestseller that generate significant revenue. Novels such as 50 Shades of Grey, The Hunger Games and Harry Potter not only sell millions of units in a short period of time, but consistently become huge income earners over the course of many financial quarters. Booksellers such as Amazon and Barnes and Noble also benefit from these types of novels, as they transcend a small minority of bookhounds and become mainstream success stories. The main problem is that a true bestseller only comes along every few years and it is the midlist author that sells between 20,000 to 100,000 units that become the bread and butter of the publishing and bookselling industry.

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The rise of the Irish literary magazine

independent.ie – Tuesday March 21, 2017

A vibrant new wave of Irish literary journals are offering insights into contemporary trends as well as giving new ideas and new writers an audience

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New Publisher Listing

firstwriter.com – Monday March 20, 2017

Publishes: Fiction; Nonfiction; 
Areas include: Autobiography; Biography; Health; Historical; Music; Nature; Philosophy; Politics; Religious; 
Markets: Children's; Youth

Publishes fiction and nonfiction for children and young adults, on such subjects as environmentalism, human rights, gender and feminism, etc.

[See the full listing]

'It's no longer about the vanity press': self-publishing gains respect — and sales

cbc.ca – Sunday March 19, 2017

Vancouver-based author Sharon Rowse was thrilled when after years of trying she finally landed a book deal with a New York publisher. 

"It had always been my dream to be published," Rowse said. 

Her novel, a historical crime story that takes place in her home town, had been "a bit of a hard sell" for the American market. 

But reality poured a big bucket of cold water on her dreams when the publisher was bought out, and its mystery section discontinued. 

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Is writer’s block a real thing, or just a figment of the imagination?

theguardian.com – Friday March 17, 2017

What do you do when you get writer’s block?” someone asked me the other day. I was happy to answer. I get up from my desk and wander around with a self-pitying expression on my face, sometimes clutching at my scalp in an agonised fashion. I buy sour gummy chews and eat too many; I compulsively click “refresh” on Twitter; I start to hate myself, and express it by snapping at others.

On reflection, I see why this response didn’t satisfy my questioner: he wanted to know what I do to overcome writer’s block. I’ve no idea. I keep eating the chews and snapping, and eventually it’s bedtime, and in the morning the block has usually gone. Feel free to try this solution yourself.

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Publishers Going Rogue: Bonnier’s SelfPub Platform

goodereader.com – Friday March 17, 2017

Despite a rocky relationship with the digital publishing revolution as recently as five years ago, a number of traditional publishers have not only made room on the shelves for indie authors, they’re building their own self-publishing avenues. But whereas companies in the US like Random House and Macmillan have bought up existing small-time presses in order to capitalize off of anyone with a book dream, others companies are actively launching those platforms.

Now, Swedish publisher Bonnier is launching its own platform called Type & Tell, and on the surface it’s much of the same talk startups have been saying for years: total creative control, anyone can publish a book, all that stuff. Initially, it sounds like old news, except in Type & Tell’s case, there are some out of reach services in the works that authors typically can’t get all in one place, and certainly not in anything considered an affordable option.

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New Magazine Listing

firstwriter.com – Friday March 17, 2017

Publishes: Essays; Fiction; Nonfiction; Poetry; Reviews; 
Areas include: Criticism; Literature; Short Stories; 
Markets: Adult; 
Preferred styles: Literary

Publishes short stories, poetry, essays, novel excerpts, literary criticism, book reviews, and interviews. Prose should be no longer than 8,000 words. No previously published submissions. See website for full guidelines.

[See the full listing]

London Book Fair 2017: For Publishers, Business Is Booming, but Brexit Means Uncertainty

publishersweekly.com – Wednesday March 15, 2017

The 2017 London Book Fair officially opened today, and at the fair’s opening press conference LBF director Jacks Thomas smiled as she raced through her slides. For the second year in a row, Thomas noted, publishers headed to London with fairly strong sales in the U.K. (and the U.S.), with literature in translation growing, children’s and digital audio surging, and print books—and bookshops—looking especially resurgent.

But following Thomas on stage at Olympia’s Grand Hall, a panel discussion broke down the potential effects of the looming Brexit on publishers, one day after British lawmakers cleared the way for the formal work of leaving the E.U. to begin.

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London Book Fair 2017: More Evidence of a Print Renaissance in the U.K.

publishersweekly.com – Tuesday March 14, 2017

In his opening keynote at the London Book Fair’s pre-conference, Quantum, Steve Bohme, research director at Nielsen Book Research U.K. ran down Nielsen’s just-released 2016 book industry stats, which showed British print book purchases on the rise for the second year in a row.

“In 2016, consumers turned up their printed book purchases by around 4%,” Bohme told attendees. “And with higher prices boosting spending, we saw spending on printed books by U.K. consumers up by 7%."

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The sums on creative writing degrees don't add up. So why do we do them?

theguardian.com – Monday March 13, 2017

When I tell people I’m doing a creative writing degree there are two questions that people usually ask: the first is “Why?’” and the second, “How?”

The “how” is an interesting place to start. With university course fees rising and incomes for writers falling, the financial outlook of a creative writing degree is at best optimistic, and at worst downright crazy.

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