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firstwriter.com's database of book publishers includes details of 2,037 English language publishers that don't charge authors any fees for publishing their books. The database is continually updated: there have been 37 listings added or updated in the last month. With over a dozen different ways to narrow your search you can find the right publisher for your book, fast.

News

thebookseller.com – October 22, 2019

Hera Books founders Keshini Naidoo and Lindsay Mooney, agent Diana Beaumont and Promising Young Women author Caroline O’Donoghue are some of the professionals who have made the shortlists for the Romantic Novelists’ Association's annual Industry Awards for 2019.

The RNA Industry Awards are voted on by its membership to recognise and to celebrate the variety of professionals whose work goes into supporting and promoting the genre of romantic fiction.

thebookseller.com – October 17, 2019

Eurospan has acquired academic and educational sales agency Transatlantic Publishers Group for an undisclosed sum. 

TGP offers US specialist academic and technical presses sales and marketing services in Europe and the Middle East. The agency was founded in 2002 and current clients include American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics (AIAA), Industrial Press, SAP Press and Kendall-Hunt Publishing.

Transatlantic m.d. Mark Chaloner will be stepping down from his post after a brief handover period. TPG will continue to use Orca Book Services for warehousing and fulfillment services in place of Eurospan’s sister distribution company Turpin Books. 

publishersweekly.com – October 3, 2019

Miami-based Mango Publishing has acquired Red Wheel/Weiser imprint Conari Press. The deal, which involved closee to 300 titles, closed on Tuesday.

Conari, founded in 1987, publishes in the areas of personal growth, spirituality, parenting and women's issues. Mango associate publisher Brenda Knight previously held the same position at Conari, and will now oversee the imprint at Mango. "I am excited to get to work with these wonderful writers and thinkers again,” Knight said. Plans call for Conari to do about 10 books annually.

gov.uk – October 3, 2019

Two rogue London-based publishers have had the book thrown at them after the courts wound-up the limited companies behind them.

Book World Limited and Hardback Printer Limited were wound up in the public interest in the Business & Property Court in Manchester on 23 September 2019. The Official Receiver has now been appointed as the Liquidator.

In considering the petition, the court heard Book World’s trade was concerned with taking orders from self-publishers before out-sourcing the jobs to suppliers predominantly based in Eastern Europe.

Articles

theguardian.com

This is a story about a book that just kept selling, catching publishers, booksellers and even its author off guard. In seeking to understand the reasons for the book’s unusually protracted shelf life, we uncover important messages about our moment in history, about the still-vital place of reading in our culture, and about the changing face of publishing.

The book is Sapiens, by the Israeli academic Yuval Noah Harari, published in the UK in September 2014. It’s a recondite work of evolutionary history charting the development of humankind through a scholarly examination of our ability to cooperate as a species. Sapiens sold well on publication, particularly when it came out in paperback in the summer of 2015. What’s remarkable about it, though, is that it’s still selling in vast numbers. In its first two and a half years of life, Sapiens sold just over 200,000 copies in the UK. Since 2017, when Harari published Homo Deus, his follow-up, Sapienshas sold a further half million copies, establishing itself firmly at the top of the bestseller lists (and convincingly outselling its sequel). Sapiens has become a publishing phenomenon and its wild success is symptomatic of a broader trend in our book-buying habits: a surge in the popularity of intelligent, challenging nonfiction, often books that are several years old.

meltontimes.co.uk

Not so long ago, writing and publishing your own book was just a pipe dream for many of us.

It wasn’t so much getting the words down on paper which was putting us off.

It was more the expense of either finding an agent and a publisher or paying through the nose to print dozens of copies yourself which might have ended up unsold and gathering dust in the garage.

But that is resoundingly no longer the case. Digital publishing and online booksellers such as Amazon have been an absolute game-changer.

publishersweekly.com

When Simon & Schuster announced in late February that it is canceling Milo Yiannopoulos’s book, Dangerous, many in the publishing industry reacted with a sigh of relief. The six-figure book deal that the right-wing provocateur landed at Threshold Editions, S&S’s conservative imprint, late last year caused a wave of criticism—from various factions of the media, the public, and the house’s own authors. And, though it’s still unclear what ultimately motivated the publisher to yank the book, the fervor that the alt-right bad boy’s deal caused put some on alert. Could other publishers be pressured into canceling books by controversial conservatives? Does the industry have a double standard for authors on the right? Does it matter?

scroll.in

Several years ago, as an aspiring novelist with stardust in my eyes, I used to spend most of my waking hours in Yahoo’s Books and Literature chatroom in the company of fellow aspiring writers. I clearly remember how one of the main topics of conversations used to be the number of rejection slips one had received on that particular day (or the previous week), agents/publishers who had requested a synopsis or proposal, and those who had just not bothered to respond. All of us were united by the looming sense of uncertainty, suspense, and the palpable realisation that the odds were firmly stacked against us.

Today, having spent more than seven years on the other side, first as a consultant and then an agent, I think many writers have wrong notions about rejections. While most books are rejected because of poor quality and incompetence (as they should be), there are several other factors that play a role in publishing decisions. And these affect “good” books too.

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