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firstwriter.com's database of magazine publishers includes details of 2,182 english language magazines from around the world. The database is continually updated: there have been 44 listings added or updated in the last month. With over fifteen different ways to narrow your search you can find the right magazine for your writing, fast.

News

firstwriter.com – October 20, 2016

Stride magazine is inviting writers to submit two or three short poems or prose poems, in the body of an email. All copyright remains with authors.

Writers are requested not to send biographical details or lists of previous publications; rhyming doggerel or shaggy dog stories masquerading as poems; or previously published work.

If you are interested in writing short, opinionated but informed reviews of poetry books (which will be sent to you) please contact the editor by email.

prweb.com – September 6, 2016

Off Assignment, a magazine of literary travel writing, recently launched the first of its online content, answering the demand for authors to enhance their published work with compelling experiences and details left unsaid. Forged by today’s top journalists, essayists, and travel writers, Off Assignment is a publication dedicated to candid storytelling. The magazine, which grew out of a grassroots series of live storytelling events featuring writers such as Gay Talese and Sloane Crosley, now publishes a weekly series called “Letter to a Stranger,” short essays about memorable strangers from past journeys. In its first weeks, the series has featured contributors such as New York Times bestselling authors Leslie Jamison and Lauren Groff, as well as memoirist Howard Axelrod and National Book Award winner Julia Glass.

publishersweekly.com – October 15, 2016

Almost as long as there have been writers, there have been books that offer instruction, guidance, and advice on how to write. From Plato’s Phaedrus to the letters and journals of great practitioners such as Emily Dickinson, John Keats, and Rainer Maria Rilke, and 20th-century monuments of the genre such as Virginia Woolf’s A Room of One’s Own, writing guides have sat steadfast on aspiring writers’ nightstands, ready to inspire and instruct. Think of these books as kind of the homeschool version of M.F.A. programs.

firstwriter.com – October 6, 2016

The Stony Thursday Book is seeking submissions from local, national and international poets for its next issue, to be published in December 2016.

The Stony Thursday Book was founded by Limerick poets John Liddy and Jim Burke in 1975, and has been edited by poets Mark WhelanKevin ByrnePatrick Bourke, Knute SkinnerThomas McCarthy,Ciarán O’Driscoll, Mary CollJo Slade, Paddy Bushe, Peter Sirr and Mary O’Donnell.

Articles

By J. Paul Dyson
firstwriter.com

One of the great things about working on a writers' site is that you get to see a lot of enthusiastic and exciting new writers. The flip side of this, however, is that you also meet a lot of jaded, bitter writers, who have come to the conclusion that there is some kind of "problem" with the publishing industry, given up any hope of ever seeing their work in print, and spend their days whinging about the terrible scourge of capitalism in the publishing world, blinding people to the value of true art.

By Christopher Willitts
firstwriter.com

Once your book hits bookstore shelves, you've got approximately eight months to produce sales. If your book doesn't prove itself after the eight months, it will almost certainly get pulled. So the time to do your marketing is way before your book even thinks about hitting the shelves.

theatlantic.com

It’s fall, the time of year when literary journals open their doors for new submissions. Around the country, writers are polishing poems, short stories, and essays in hopes of getting published in those small-but-competitive journals devoted to good writing. Though I’ve published short stories in the past, I’m not submitting any this year, and if things continue the way they have been, I may stop writing them altogether. The reason, in a nutshell, is reading fees—also called submission or service fees—which many literary journals now charge writers who want to be considered for publication. Writers pay a fee that usually ranges from $2 to $5—but sometimes goes as high as $25—and in return, the journal will either (most likely) reject or accept their submission and publish it. Even in the lucky case that a piece is published, most journals don’t pay writers for their work, making it a net loss either way.

By Bruce Harris
firstwriter.com

This is for people who are making plans for a brand new year, and especially people who have decided that in 2015, they are going to stop making unfulfilled promises to themselves for some unspecified time in the future and actually give writing fiction a go. Savvy enough to already know that getting a first novel into print without a publication record is well nigh impossible, they decide that short fiction is the necessary first step.

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