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firstwriter.com's database of magazines includes details of 2,435 English language magazines from around the world. The database is continually updated: there have been 52 listings added or updated in the last month. With over a dozen different ways to narrow your search you can find the right magazine for your writing, fast.

News

anothermag.com – August 11, 2020

What could – and indeed, should – a magazine look like in 2020? That was the question British publishing veterans Dan Crowe and Matt Willey asked themselves when their latest collaboration, INQUE – a large-format literary magazine launched last month – was in its nascent stages. As the founders of Avaunt and Port magazines (at the latter, Crowe is editor and publisher) they were all too familiar with the traditional magazine model; the reliance of advertisers to fund the printing and distribution of a magazine, and the way that such partnerships impact the content inside the pages.

completemusicupdate.com – July 21, 2020

Q magazine will close after one final issue, it has been confirmed. Publisher Bauer Media had hoped to find a buyer, but seemingly no deal could be done to rescue the music magazine.

It was one of ten titles put up for review by Bauer in May. Last month it was announced that three of those ten would close, including another younger music title, the magazine spin-off of radio station Planet Rock. But Q was among five magazines that the publisher hoped might be bought by another company, with talks about a possible sale seemingly at an “advanced” stage.

Prior to that announcement the team who produce Q were pretty certain closure was incoming and put together the most recent issue as if it was the last. The prospect of surviving under new ownership allowed them to start working on another edition, but yesterday Editor Ted Kessler confirmed closure was now confirmed, making the upcoming issue the grand finale.

deadline.com – September 25, 2020

Peter McGuigan, who co-created the New York literary agency Foundry Literary + Media with Yfat Reiss Gendell, has launched a new agency dubbed Ultra Literary.

The move comes after the news last week that Gendell exited Foundry to form YRG Partners, taking Foundry agents Tanusri Prasanna, Peter Steinberg and Adriann Ranta Zurhellen and their clients with her. That agency will focus on representing publishing rights for writers and consumer brands.

firstwriter.com – September 25, 2020

Focused on bold, diverse voices in fiction and nonfiction. She’s especially interested in stories of strong or difficult women and unexpected narratives of place, of identity, and of the shifting ways we see ourselves and each other. She’s also interested in food history, wine, and dance.

Articles

bookriot.com

As both an author and library employee, I’m intrigued by libraries that publish literary magazines. Since so many libraries offer services for local writers and writer organizations, it seems like a natural extension.

In fact, last month I had the pleasure of being a judge—along with authors Sarah McGuire and Peter Raymundo—for the Osceola Library System’s third annual literary contest for kids aged 8–17. The theme was “There’s a Monster in My Lit Mag!” and while the ceremony for the winners has been cancelled, the winners will be read in an upcoming episode of the library’s Nonfiction Friends podcast by Jonathan, the amazing Youth Specialist who coordinated the contest.

writingcooperative.com

Do you remember the good old days? Back in your youth when the summers were longer, we had the best music and fashions, and life was so much sweeter, despite the world’s problems? Can you conjure up those glory days gone by, and set them down in emotion-provoking, elegant, or humorous prose?

If you can write articles that give the reader “roses in December,” you stand a good chance of selling nostalgia themed stories to magazines, websites, and blogs that publish and pay for them. Nostalgia never goes out of style. As every new generation grows up and transitions into middle age, it looks back fondly on its youth.

Whether you were young in the 50s and 60s, the 70s, the 80s, or the 90s, you’ll find magazines, websites, blogs, TV and radio channels, social media groups, clubs, associations and societies — many of which have newsletters in need of fresh content — dedicated to nostalgia for the lifestyle, music, fashion, language, personalities, and atmosphere of those times. All of these offer potential opportunities for the freelance writer. If you want to write for magazines, you could start with Nostalgia MagazineReminisce, or The Good Old Days in the USA, and Best of BritishThe People’s FriendThe Oldie, or This England in the UK.

scroll.in

When Anupama Krishnakumar and Vani Viswanathan started the online literary magazine Spark in January 2010, they weren’t sure how many issues they would be able to put out into the world. In January 2018, they celebrated eight years of the magazine and in April, their 100th issue will be released.

Putting out a literary magazine every month for eight years has its challenges, especially when running it alongside professional and personal commitments. Each month, the magazine focuses on a theme, ranging from “Navarasas” to “Life Online” to “Shopping”, features writing across genres and is freely available to read without advertising or a subscription fee. In an interview with Scroll.in, the co-founders spoke about their individual understanding of how the magazine has survived, the practical approach to running a non-commercial venture, how they choose what submissions to feature, the pressures of multiple responsibilities, and the changes in creative writing online.

writingcooperative.com

Health stories make the covers of magazines and newspapers almost every day. From the latest weight loss method to a potential cancer cure, editors are actively seeking story ideas.

Freelance writers who write health articles for consumer magazines can get as little as $50 for short pieces and as much as $5,000 for feature articles in top magazines.

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