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firstwriter.com's database of magazines includes details of 2,415 English language magazines from around the world. The database is continually updated: there have been 54 listings added or updated in the last month. With over a dozen different ways to narrow your search you can find the right magazine for your writing, fast.

News

temple-news.com – November 12, 2020

After losing her fiancé to suicide, Jenna Faccenda began wrestling with her life’s purpose.

“Those deep thoughts and how my footprint on this Earth could really be impactful toward someone else,” Faccenda said. 

Amid her grief, Faccenda, a 2017 journalism alumna, turned back to her love of writing and ventured to create a community for other artists experiencing trauma. She launched Eclipse Lit, a literature magazine for writers to discuss trauma and heal through their artwork. 

With writer submissions open from Oct. 1 through Nov. 15, Faccenda intends to publish her first edition, a collection of short stories, essays and multimedia art from artists around Philadelphia, in March 2021.

filmstories.co.uk – October 3, 2020

We’re opening back up for writing pitches across our magazines – and if you’re interested, here’s some information to help you put together your pitch.

At the end of September, with thanks to an amazing bunch of readers, we were able to secure funding – via Kickstarter – to keep our magazines going until the back end of 2021 at least. As such, it means we can start commissioning writing again.

A few bits and bobs if you’re new to Film Stories. One of the key foundations of our work is to ensure, wherever we can, we lower the drawbridge of opportunity. That we want to provide a point of entry to the industry for those who are otherwise struggling to find one.

As such, we look to give at least two writers their first paid print writing work in every issue of our magazine. Thus far, the youngest has been in their teens, the oldest in their 70s.

Then we have Film Stories Junior, which I’ll come to at the bottom of this post.

I’m asked an awful lot how to pitch, and what kind of things I look for when it comes to Film Stories magazine. I’m very fortunate that so many are interested in what we do, and grateful for that. Hopefully this post, though, will help those wondering how to pitch, and what to pitch. It’s actually a lot easier than you might think.

firstwriter.com – November 21, 2020

The 2021 edition of firstwriter.com’s bestselling directory for writers is out now, and represents the biggest overhaul of the book to date!

The number of listings of literary agents, publishers, and magazines has increased dramatically – from just over 1,300 in the last edition to over 3,000 in the new one. In fact, there are so many new listings that we've increased the page size by 70% to accommodate them. The new page size makes the book even easier to use as a physical object: while thicker books with smaller pages refuse to stay open on the page you want, the 2021 edition of The Writers' Handbook is much happier to lay open at the page you leave it on.

hotair.com – December 5, 2020

For some reason the Young Adult Fiction subculture has become one of the most woke and therefore toxic online. Nearly two years ago Jesse Singal wrote about the cancelation of author Amélie Wen Zhao whose unpublished novel Blood Heir was accused of being racist despite the fact that no one had read it.

This week Singal has been tweeting about another case of mob justice in the YA space on Twitter. Author Jessica Cluess has been accused of racism. The problem wasn’t her book in this instance it was a disagreement she had with someone else on Twitter. That someone else happened to be a minority and so the cancel culture mob is off to the races. Singal’s thread starts with Jessica’s agent throwing her under the bus:

Articles

bookriot.com

Literary magazines need love too. Which is why we like to celebrate them here on Book Riot! We’ve had a Literary Magazines 101 to get you started, discussed general short fiction magazinesscience fiction/fantasy magazines, and we’ve even had a how-to post on reading (and writing for) science fiction magazines in particular. But today I want to give a little love to my current obsession: dark fiction. Though you can find dark fiction stories in a lot of different literary magazines, including most of the SFF magazines above, this post is a tribute to those literary magazines that specialize in the macabre, whether it’s horror, dark fantasy, or positively grim science fiction.

splicetoday.com

Many years ago, an editor at The Chicago Quarterly Review sent me one of the most colorful rejections I’ve gotten from a magazine: “I can’t think of a single person who’d want to spend thirty seconds with these morons,” meaning the characters in my short story but also, in a way, me.

It was a story about falling in love with a stripper in Missoula, titled “The Machinery Above Us,” and Eclipse Magazine took it some time after that. There were graphic parts in it and I noticed that the rejections came most fluidly from the Ivy and Ivy-adjacent literary journals on my submission A-list. The Partisan ReviewThe Paris ReviewDoubletakeStory, and Boulevard rejected it with a quickness. They seemed to find the material distasteful.

thebookseller.com

The digital revolution has been something of an asteroid for the whole publishing industry, but it has presented particularly gnarly challenges to libraries, colleges and schools. 

How to transfer collections from the stacks to the screen? How does digital lending work, both practically and financially? Which texts would publishers be willing to digitise, and which would languish in analogue ignominy on the shelves?

irishtimes.com

Reading the mission statements of Irish literary journals, a common theme emerges: the desire to offer writers the space to develop ideas that may not otherwise find a platform. From the more established titles such as Dublin ReviewCrannóg and The Stinging Fly, which published its first issue 20 years ago this month, to more recent outlets like The BohemythBanshee and gorse, fostering talent new and old is the backbone of “the little magazine”.

A vibrant journal scene with a roots-up feel to it has developed in Ireland in the past decade. There are currently in the region of 30 publications across print and online media seeking submissions multiple times a year. This has coincided with a growing enthusiasm for creative writing in general, with all of the major colleges in Ireland and many other cultural organisations offering programmes ranging from evening courses for beginners to two-year MFAs (Master of Fine Arts).

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