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firstwriter.com's database of magazines includes details of 2,358 English language magazines from around the world. The database is continually updated: there have been 45 listings added or updated in the last month. With over a dozen different ways to narrow your search you can find the right magazine for your writing, fast.

News

theguardian.com – August 16, 2021

Future, the owner of titles including Country Life and Metal Hammer, has acquired the publisher of magazines including The Week and Minecraft World in a £300m deal.

The deal is the latest in a buying spree by Britain’s biggest magazine publisher, which spent almost £600m buying the comparison site GoCompare in November, and will hand a significant profit to Dennis Publishing’s private equity owners Exponent.

Future is buying a portfolio of 12 titles including the adult and junior versions of current affairs title The Week in the US and UK, MoneyWeek, Coach, Computer Active, PC Pro and IT Pro.

journalism.co.uk

Many journalists find their way to the industry because of their love of writing. We put together words and sentences to tell stories that matter, always with one eye on the word count and deadlines. Most of the time, we enjoy the process of writing as much as seeing the final piece of work getting published.

But what is good writing? Is it the ability of a perspicacious reporter to punctiliously select supreme words, refining his or her locution to the point of perfection? Or is it the skill of telling a story clearly, concisely and accurately?

You know the answer. But sometimes journalists’ passion for the written word can be their worst enemy and we end up stuffing our stories with fluff and gibberish.

firstwriter.com – September 16, 2021

Has a passion for immersive fiction, and content-rich non-fiction. She also has a soft spot for military history.

firstwriter.com – September 15, 2021

A small, independent publishing company with the goal of helping photographers of all levels improve their skills in capturing those moments that matter. Creates books that help you master the technology, find inspiration, and hone your craft in order to create better pictures. Also now publishing books on drawing, painting, graphic design, crafts, and much more.

Articles

bookriot.com

Literary magazines need love too. Which is why we like to celebrate them here on Book Riot! We’ve had a Literary Magazines 101 to get you started, discussed general short fiction magazinesscience fiction/fantasy magazines, and we’ve even had a how-to post on reading (and writing for) science fiction magazines in particular. But today I want to give a little love to my current obsession: dark fiction. Though you can find dark fiction stories in a lot of different literary magazines, including most of the SFF magazines above, this post is a tribute to those literary magazines that specialize in the macabre, whether it’s horror, dark fantasy, or positively grim science fiction.

bookriot.com

Little literary magazines come and go. Shi’r was here one decade, gone another. So too Tin House, Souffles, The Partisan Review, and Black Clock. Indeed, author Nick Ripatrazone went so far as to write last year that “Literary Magazines are Born to Die.” He didn’t mean it as a bad thing, but rather that we should recognize they have a life cycle and pay tribute to our literary ancestors.

thebookseller.com

The digital revolution has been something of an asteroid for the whole publishing industry, but it has presented particularly gnarly challenges to libraries, colleges and schools. 

How to transfer collections from the stacks to the screen? How does digital lending work, both practically and financially? Which texts would publishers be willing to digitise, and which would languish in analogue ignominy on the shelves?

splicetoday.com

Many years ago, an editor at The Chicago Quarterly Review sent me one of the most colorful rejections I’ve gotten from a magazine: “I can’t think of a single person who’d want to spend thirty seconds with these morons,” meaning the characters in my short story but also, in a way, me.

It was a story about falling in love with a stripper in Missoula, titled “The Machinery Above Us,” and Eclipse Magazine took it some time after that. There were graphic parts in it and I noticed that the rejections came most fluidly from the Ivy and Ivy-adjacent literary journals on my submission A-list. The Partisan ReviewThe Paris ReviewDoubletakeStory, and Boulevard rejected it with a quickness. They seemed to find the material distasteful.

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