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Writers' News

New Publisher Listing: Kane Press

firstwriter.com – Wednesday November 2, 2022

An award-winning publisher of illustrated STEAM and literacy titles. Fiction and nonfiction books for ages 3–11 feature fun stories with curriculum connections and are the perfect springboard for learning in classrooms, libraries, and homes. Currently accepting proposals for series only, from published authors and literary agents.

[See the full listing]

Books at Berlinale Issues Its 2022 Call for Submissions

publishingperspectives.com – Tuesday November 1, 2022

The annual Books at Berlinale program now is accepting submissions from film-rights holders for novels with high adaptation potential.

The Books at Berlinale program—long familiar to our Publishing Perspectives international readership—has issued its call for submissions for its 18th edition, scheduled to take place as a part of the Berlinale Co-Production Market, February 18 to 22.

A joint initiative of the Berlin International Film Festival and Frankfurter Buchmesse.

As usual, the 18th edition of “Books at Berlinale” will take place during the Berlinale as part of the of the Berlinale Co-Production Market (Feb 18-22, 2023).

As you know, the program selects 12 or so books to pitch to an audience of some 150 internationally established producers during the film festival.

[Read the full article]

US judge blocks $2.2bn Penguin Random House merger

theguardian.com – Tuesday November 1, 2022

A US judge has blocked the $2.2bn planned merger of Penguin Random House, the world’s largest book publisher, with rival Simon & Schuster.

Judge Florence Pan of the US district court for the District of Columbia said in a brief order on Monday that she had found that the justice department had shown that the deal would “substantially” harm competition “in the market for the US publishing rights to anticipated top-selling books”.

Unlike most merger fights, which are focused on what consumers pay, this one focused on authors’ earnings. The US government argued that fewer publishing houses being in competition with each other would lead to lower advances for authors across the board, but focused on a small part of the market: bestselling writers who were paid $250,000 or more.

[Read the full article]

New Literary Agent Listing: Saffron Dodd

firstwriter.com – Tuesday November 1, 2022

I’m looking for fully realised, immersive, and creative worlds with standout characters. I love middle-grade fantasy and I’m looking for something filled with adventure, magic, and intrigue, with a strong and distinct voice. In contemporary middle-grade, I’m looking for witty and sharp protagonists with something to say and an interesting perspective on the world. In YA, I lean towards fantasy but would also love a solid mystery thriller or a shenanigan filled rom-com that does or says something new. I’m also keen to see stories set in the UK during the transitional period between sixth form/college and university. Above all, I’m keen to see work from historically excluded and underrepresented writers in the UK.

[See the full listing]

Publishing: The Cancel Mob Targets Amy Coney Barrett's New Book | Mind Matters

mindmatters.ai – Sunday October 30, 2022

Last year, Mind Matters News covered the new phenomenon of publishing house staff going to war against the publisher’s own books. It’s a far cry from the days when publishers might have to defend their books in a courtroom. Last year the target was, among other authors, best-selling psychologist Jordan Peterson.

We were informed by Maclean’s Magazine that “Employees at Penguin Random House Canada speak out on how they’re rethinking their workplaces and why publishing, writ large, should weigh its moral responsibilities” in connection with Peterson’s latest, Beyond Order: 12 More Rules for Life (Penguin 2021).

The book did get published, despite them, to five star reviews. But Cancel Culture staff continue to lead the charge for “depublishing” and have succeeded with many less well known targets. Orwell Prize-winning author Kate Clanchy’s memoir was Canceled by its original publisher (though acquired by another. Blake Bailey’s biography of author Philip Roth was Canceled by W.W. Norton due to the author’s and subject’s Me Too sins. Young adult author Jessica Cluess was Canceled after she defended literary classics.

The latest attempt at big-name Cancelation is aimed at U.S. Supreme Court justice Amy Coney Barrett. Early in 2021 she was signed by Penguin’s Sentinel imprint to write a book on her judicial philosophy and the reasoning behind her decisions.

[Read the full article]

New Literary Agent Listing: Kaitlyn Sanchez

firstwriter.com – Friday October 28, 2022

Looking for children’s books (picture books through YA) in all categories, including graphic novels, nonfiction, and illustration. She is incredibly eclectic in her tastes, with a great affinity for emotional stories as well as funny stories. Always looking for diversity in all forms, including but not limited to BIPOC, neurodiversity, and LGBTQ+. Loves working with artists, so she’s always on the lookout for great illustrators, author-illustrators, and graphic novelists. Generally leans PG and PG-13 for most submissions, though some intensity here and there is fine.

[See the full listing]

The Moth and Caterpillar magazines to cease publishing but prizes will continue

thebookseller.com – Thursday October 27, 2022

Arts and literature magazines the Moth and the Caterpillar will cease publishing next summer, its directors have announced, but the four literary prizes associated with the magazines will continue with increased prize pots. 

Directors Rebecca O’Connor and Will Govan said: “We will have had 13 happy years. It feels like the right time to focus on things other than the publications.”

Govan said back issues of both magazines will be sold online so people can complete their vintage collections. 

[Read the full article]

The Bath Children's Novel Award

artshub.com.au – Thursday October 27, 2022

The Bath Children’s Novel Award is a £3,000 international prize for yet to be published and independently published children’s authors.

The award is judged by leading children’s literary agents from a shortlist chosen by Junior Judges aged up to seventeen years. Submissions are open worldwide until 23:59 GMT 30th November 2022.

This year’s judge is Amber Caravéo. Co-founder of the Skylark Literary Agency and previously Editorial Director at Orion Children’s Books, Amber has worked with some of the best authors in Children’s and YA fiction today and is looking for “potential rather than perfection and new voices that offer something unique and brilliant either in terms of story or style.”

[Read the full article]

Dodd steps up at ASH Literary

thebookseller.com – Thursday October 27, 2022

Agency assistant at Saffron Dodd is being promoted to associate agent at ASH Literary, focusing on middle-grade and YA titles.

Taking up the new role on 1st January 2023, Dodd will be building her own list, prioritising UK creators, alongside agency founder Alice Sutherland-Hawes.

Sutherland-Hawes said: “Saffron joined the agency at the start of 2022 and has made a lasting impact on our clients and the work we do. Her passion and joy for the work has been wonderful to witness and I am so excited for her future with the agency. I can’t wait to welcome her clients to ASH Literary.”

[Read the full article]

Lee Child and Andrew Child on Discipline, Dread, and Writing Late at Night

crimereads.com – Wednesday October 26, 2022

Lee and Andrew Child’s new book, No Plan B, was released earlier today, so we asked them a few questions about writing routine, advice, and influence.

What time of day do you write (and why)?

Lee Child: I’m ruled by my biological clock, which mandates one unshakeable conclusion: nothing of value is ever achieved in the morning. Typically I get up late and spend a couple of hours moving from a comatose state into something resembling human life. Then I’ll start work about 1 or 2 in the afternoon. I have learned to sense the point when quality starts to diminish, which is usually about 6 hours later, so I’ll stop then. Often I get a second energy peak around midnight, so I’ll do another couple of hours before bed, especially in the later stages when the story is really rolling. Usually a book takes between 80 and 90 working days, spread out over about 7 months.

Andrew Child: My favorite time to write is at night. I like it best when darkness falls and the world shrinks down to the size of the pool of light that spills from my laptop screen. That just leaves me alone with the story I’m telling, nothing to distract, nothing to interfere.

[Read the full article]

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