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Writers' News

Everything Change Climate Fiction Contest

By Joey Eschrich
Editor and Program Manager, Center for Science and the Imagination, Arizona State University

firstwriter.com – Wednesday October 25, 2017

The Imagination and Climate Futures Initiative at Arizona State University is proud to announce our Everything Change Climate Fiction Contest. We are looking for stories that illustrate, explore, or illuminate the impact of climate change on humanity and/or the Earth. We invite submissions in all genres of short fiction. 

[Read the full article]

CINE-BOOKS aims to unite authors and filmmakers with a new three-in-one format

thebookseller.com – Wednesday October 25, 2017

CINE-BOOKS is a "next generation publishing and book-filming startup" that offers a 'three-in-one' digital book format, as well as a global distribution platform that aims to connect readers, authors and film-makers in the creation of highly visual books.

[Read the full article]

New Publisher Listing

firstwriter.com – Tuesday October 24, 2017

Publishes: Fiction; Nonfiction; 
Areas include: Autobiography; Biography; Crime; Current Affairs; Historical; Politics; Science; Sociology; Translations; 
Markets: Adult; 
Preferred styles: Literary

Send query by email with bio, synopsis, and two sample chapters.

[See the full listing]

How do you write a novel in just a month? With this app – that's how

techradar.com – Monday October 23, 2017

In the words of Bon Jovi, woah, we’re halfway there. I’m midway through my novel’s first draft. It feels much like crossing the 13.1 mile mark in a marathon – a sense of achievement, tempered by the realization that I have to do the same thing all over again.

Still, I have a good idea of where I need to go and how I’m going to get there, and it isn’t going to involve any blisters or horrible sticky energy gels. Seriously, who thought peanut flavor was a good idea?

I’ve had to double back a few times, re-writing and rearranging scenes that didn’t sit right. Those occasions have required a quick trip into LibreOffice Writer (try it – you won't believe it's not Word), but the rest of the time I’ve stuck with the superb distraction-blocking writing software FocusWriter.

[Read the full article]

Are White Authors Not Allowed To Tell Stories Involving Black Characters?

huffingtonpost.com – Monday October 23, 2017

Storytellers are the chroniclers of our life and times. They memorialize history, dissect our complex and evolving world; they entertain and provoke and captivate. They are as diverse and eclectic as the characters they create and the stories they tell. It is their job to reflect who we are, what we experience, and what we can imagine. That’s a big canvas. It’s huge. And there’s no end to the variety of colors and hues that can be drawn upon it. Just as there is no end to the variety of artists weaving the tales drawn there.

Yet some believe there are rules to who gets to use which colors, who gets to draw outside the lines to tell stories that involve characters from different cultures. Some believe issues of race can only be voiced from within limited perspectives. Who gets to decide that? Who determines the answer to the title question?

[Read the full article]

5 things I wish I’d known before writing my first novel, Five Parks

metro.co.uk – Sunday October 22, 2017

I have written a novel.

Five words that every writer, aspiring or otherwise, longs to pen, or, as is more likely these days, type.

And I am lucky enough to have joined the club.

My first novel, Five Parks, a psychological thriller, was published by Endeavour Press in August.

It’s about a female freelance journalist who is kidnapped after going on five different blind dates with five different men in five different parks in London.

When she wakes up after the fifth date handcuffed in a dark room, she has to figure out – by continuing her dating blog, Five Parks – where she is and who took her.

It’s High Fidelity meets Misery, with a dollop of Charlie And The Chocolate Factory thrown in. And it was a lot of fun to write.

But it was also bloody hard.

Here are five things I wish I’d known before writing my first novel.

[Read the full article]

What I Learned From Binge-Writing Nine Bad Novels

vitals.lifehacker.com – Friday October 20, 2017

This year, I will write my tenth terrible novel. I do this every November; it’s part of the NaNoWriMo tradition. I’ve never published these novels, but I grow as a writer and as a human being every time I write one. Let me tell you why it’s worthwhile.

[Read the full article]

Philip Pullman: Rules of writing from man behind His Dark Materials

bbc.co.uk – Thursday October 19, 2017

So what are the tricks of the trade that has made Pullman such a success - and the tips he can pass on to budding writers?

He spoke to the BBC about his lucky pen and why he can work to the sound of a pneumatic drill, but never to music.

[Read the full article]

5 Tips for Writing Family Into Fiction Without Burning Bridges

signature-reads.com – Wednesday October 18, 2017

Before you read this, I should tell you that as I write this, my first and only novel Seven Days of Us has not yet been published. And so far, my husband and parents are my only family to have read it. So I’m not sure how qualified I am to advise on ‘Writing family into fiction without burning bridges’.

Still, I do know all about not deliberately offending loved ones in print, thanks to a social stereotypes column I wrote in The Sunday Times for two years. Inevitably I drew on real life, nearly every week, and often my sources had to be tactfully hidden. Occasionally I didn’t realize I had borrowed from reality, until just before the deadline. Then I had to send frantic emails to my favorite sub-editor: ‘Please could you change ‘espadrille’ in the second paragraph to ‘moccasin’ – I’m so sorry to ask this but my cousin is a big espadrille-wearer and may be insulted.’ Once I even had to add, truthfully: ‘He is also terminally ill, so I really don’t want to upset him.’ Aaaagh.

[Read the full article]

What does it take to write and publish a book? Fire in the belly

huffingtonpost.com – Wednesday October 18, 2017

When I decided to write my book, many years ago, I was committed. I had what I called “Fire in the Belly.” That is what it took for me to stay with it. I had passion and conviction that the story was important. It was history that had never been public. I needed to set the record straight, and I believed in myself that I was the person to write it.

I had a lot of challenges, though:

[Read the full article]

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