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Writers' News

Fengdu Novel Launches Its First Writing Contest to Promote Growth of Fantasy Authors

prnewswire.com – Monday March 15, 2021

SHANGHAI, March 15, 2021 /PRNewswire/ -- CooTek (Cayman) Inc. (NYSE: CTK) ("CooTek" or the "Company"), a fast-growing global mobile internet company, today announced to launch the first "Fengdu Cup" Fantasy Literature Writing Contest by Fengdu Novel, CooTek's reading platform for free and original online literature, calling on online literature writers across China to actively create excellent works.

The contest opens submission from March 1 to August 31, 2021, and mainly collect works themed around the metaphysical fantasy genre. The goal is to select top-quality online literary content and potential writers and provide them with high-traffic premium platform to present their talent. The most outstanding works of this contest will not only win access to Fengdu Novel's traffic but also opportunities to further nurture the IP content.

[Read the full article]

New Magazine Listing: The Tusculum Review

firstwriter.com – Monday March 15, 2021

We seek well-crafted writing that takes risks. We publish work in and between all genres: poetry, fiction, essays, and plays--we appreciate work in experimental and traditional modes. We accept prose submissions of less than 6,000 words (24 double-spaced pages) and poetry submissions under 10 pages. We publish scripts in the 10-minute format (10 pages).

[See the full listing]

Northeast Indie Publishers Stuck with Their Niches in 2020

publishersweekly.com – Sunday March 14, 2021

New England’s independent publishers are known for carving out strong niches and holding steadfast to them, come what may. The extraordinary forces of the last year—pandemic, protests, and climate change—put that model to the test, and for five publishers it appears that strategy paid off.

At the outset of the pandemic, sales took a nosedive at Interlink Publishing Group in Northampton, Mass., as traditional sales channels collapsed. “Most independent booksellers canceled their orders for our spring list, Amazon suspended ordering for a month, and international trade came to a complete halt,” said founder and publisher Michel Moushabeck. “It was a very scary time.”

Sales rebounded in fall, however, and Interlink ended the year up 8% over 2019. Moushabeck attributed the gains to a list that cultivated a dedicated audience who sought out the publisher’s brand of international cultural histories, fiction, cookbooks, and children’s books through new avenues. He helped readers find those new sales channels, including direct-to-home ordering, by writing two customer newsletters a week and ramping up social media.

[Read the full article]

Sky Studios to inspire next generation of Northern writing talent

prolificnorth.co.uk – Sunday March 14, 2021

Sky Studios has partnered with writing development agency, New Writing North to inspire the next generation of television writers.

Sky Writes has been created to help “diversify the pool” of scriptwriters and will offer an introduction to writing for television for people from under-represented groups and under-served geographical areas in the North of England. 

“We are delighted to be working with Sky Studios on this initiative. The programme is an effective and innovative way of addressing issues that we know make it hugely challenging for underrepresented writers to break into screenwriting,” explained Will Mackie, Senior Programme Manager (Writing and Awards) at New Writing North.

“We know that our region is bursting with talent and through a programme like Sky Writes we’re looking to offer the kind of grassroots development that has the potential to open doors and create meaningful long-term opportunities. We have recruited inspirational and hard-working Programme Producers and Writers in Residence to carry out this work.”

[Read the full article]

Know thy reader

thebookseller.com – Friday March 12, 2021

With the levelling off of e-book sales, many have begun to wonder whether the book publishing industry will be spared the kinds of disruption experienced by other sectors of the media industries. But the digital transformation of the book publishing industry was never fundamentally about e-books anyway: e-books turned out to be just another format by which publishers could deliver their content to readers, not the game-changer that many thought (or feared) it would be. The big question that the digital revolution posed to book publishers is just as pressing today as it was a decade ago: it’s the question of how publishers understand who their ‘customers’ are, and how they relate to and interact with them. 

For most of the 500-year history of the book publishing industry, publishers understood their customers to be retailers: publishers were a B2B business, selling books to retailers, and they knew very little about the ultimate customers of their books, the readers. The digital revolution has forced publishers to think again about this model and to consider whether there might be something to be gained by becoming more reader-centric. This fundamental shift in publishers’ self-understanding is likely to be one of the most significant and enduring consequences of the digital revolution in publishing. 

[Read the full article]

Harrogate Crime Writing Festival set to make summer comeback

examinerlive.co.uk – Friday March 12, 2021

Theakston Old Peculier Crime Writing Festival is set to return to Harrogate this summer.

Harrogate International Festivals confirmed today that plans are in place for the event to run at the Old Swan Hotel from July 22-25.

Organisers hope the festival will be able to go ahead live and are adapting operational plans to ensure this can happen in a safe and covid-secure way.

In a statement on its website, Harrogate International Festivals said: “We are working hard on 2021’s Festival and have ambitions to run a live event in July.

[Read the full article]

Glasgow Caledonian University opens TV script writing opportunity

glasgowtimes.co.uk – Friday March 12, 2021

A GLASGOW university is on the hunt for experienced writers to help create a climate change drama. 

The three year PhD programme at Glasgow Caledonian University will produce a script that will encourage viewers to consider the UN’s Sustainable Development Goals.

Dr Catriona Miller, senior lecturer in MA TV Fiction Writing, said: "Drama has a huge capacity to start conversations."

The prospective script will be inspired by shows like The West Wing and The Thick of It​. 

Candidates will be expected to produce a dissertation as well as a completed script.

[Read the full article]

New Literary Agent Listing: Renae Moore

firstwriter.com – Thursday March 11, 2021

In YA and Adult, she is interested in speculative fiction, mystery, thrillers, and select romance. She is always interested in #OwnVoices.

[See the full listing]

How do writers of children’s books meet their readers during a pandemic?

irishtimes.com – Tuesday March 9, 2021

On March 12th last year I was sitting in a blustery, empty car park in Blackpool, Lancashire, eating a bland prepacked sandwich beside a giant mural of Barry from The Chuckle Brothers. I was feeling pretty good about myself.

Sure, school closures had just been announced and the St Patrick’s Festival (at which I had an author event) had been cancelled, but I’d just finished a school talk about my children’s books. It had been the last of a four-day book tour of England and my 39th author event in 40 days.

Irish events included every Dublin city library, several bookshops, a delightfully raucous event with illustrator Ben Mantle at Liberty Hall Theatre, a school in the Dublin Mountains, classes of kids spread out on the floor of O’Mahony’s Booksellers in Limerick, a packed-out art workshop in the Hugh Lane Gallery, a lot of M50 miles, a couple of flights, and a handful of hotel breakfast buffets I now regret not taking full advantage of.

It had been exceptionally busy, but still just about within the range of expectations when you write books for children. I had done hundreds of events over the preceding years, to audiences as high as 700 and as low as one (there had been a mix-up, I was assured). This is the life of writers for every age and genre, in fact. Talking about writing is how we meet readers, promote books, seek inspiration, find ideas and – crucially – earn income.

Eating my lunch on my lap in the Blackpool car park before heading to the flight home felt like the beginnings of decompression. Sure, festivals were in wait-and-see mode – the whole country was – but the timescale seemed short enough. What was the worst that could happen?

[Read the full article]

Drawing Matter Writing Prize 2021

architectsjournal.co.uk – Tuesday March 9, 2021

The competition – now in its second year – invites people aged over 18 to submit a short essay that explores the role of drawings in the ‘process of design, and the buildings or objects they represent’.

The call for submissions aims to generate a number of texts that respond to items within the Drawing Matter collection – an archive of architects’ drawings, designed by Hugh Strange and located in rural Somerset. Last year’s winners included Drawing People by Daniel Innes and Figures of War by Francesco Marullo.

According to the brief: ‘The Drawing Matter Trust is pleased to announce the return of the Drawing Matter Writing Prize. The competition invites participants to carefully look at drawings and to consider what they reveal about the process of design, and the buildings or objects they represent.

[Read the full article]

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