Traditional Publishing

Writers' News

Will Sci-Fi Bots Write the Next Great Dystopian Novel? – Wednesday November 16, 2016

OAKLAND, Calif. — William Faulkner kept the words flowing with a steady drip of whiskey. Laurence Sterne conquered writer's block by shaving his beard. Ernest Hemingway stopped writing just when the story got good, so he'd always know where to pick up the next day.

But perhaps the next generation of writers may get a boost from robots that do the hard work for them. An idea, put forth by an American author, is to use artificial intelligence to fill in parts of a story, an email or other document when a writer is searching for the best way to express him or herself. Programs that use neural networks (machines modeled after the brain) or so-called deep learning may be especially useful, Robin Sloan, the author of "Mr. Penumbra's 24-Hour Bookstore" (Farrar, Straus and Giroux, 2012), said here at the Real Future Fair yesterday (Nov. 15). [Super-Intelligent Machines: 7 Robotic Futures]

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The Daily Writing Habits Of 10 Famous Authors – Tuesday November 15, 2016

Deep breaths, NaNoWriMo people (NaNoWriMoers?). One page at a time. You can do it. And even if you're not a caffeine-addled writer trying to frantically crank out an entire novel in a month, you can find a way to balance regular writing with eating, sleeping, and perhaps even socializing. Many authors before you have managed it—even if a lot of them had somewhat... unique writing habits. So here are a few accomplished author's daily writing routines, to inspire you to stick with that writing schedule.

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Nick Earls successfully takes on dark art of digital publishing with novella experiment – Monday November 14, 2016

Brisbane author Nick Earls says his multi-platform experiment, publishing five novellas in five months, seems to have proved a risk worth taking.

With the help of boutique Australian publisher Inkerman and Blunt, Earls this year released the novellas simultaneously in print, as ebooks and as audiobooks — embracing online publishing in a way most traditional publishers have scrupulously avoided until now.

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We Can All Help Children Unlock The Joys Of Writing – Friday November 11, 2016

In recent years, reading for enjoyment has been prioritised in schools, across government policy and through third sector initiatives, reaping huge rewards for children. Indeed, our research shows that year-on-year, growing numbers of pupils are reading for pleasure and enjoying reading.

With writing for enjoyment receiving nowhere near the same level of cross-sector support, it is perhaps unsurprising that our latest research, Children and Young People’s Writing in 2015, revealed that pupils are enjoying writing far less than reading and do not write outside of school as often as they read.

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New Magazine Listing – Friday November 11, 2016

Publishes: Poetry; 
Markets: Adult; 
Preferred styles: Literary

Send 3-7 poems by email as an attachment.

[See the full listing]

Breaking the mould: the Goldsmiths Prize-shortlisted authors on innovative fiction – Thursday November 10, 2016

The Goldsmiths Prize rewards fiction that “extends the possibilities of the novel form”. In a series of interviews, the six authors shortlisted for the 2016 prize discuss creative risk, writing sex, the pitfalls of the publishing industry, and why so many of them are Irish.

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New Publisher Listing – Wednesday November 9, 2016

Publishes: Fiction; Nonfiction; Poetry; 
Areas include: Autobiography; Short Stories; Travel; 
Markets: Adult

Accepts submissions of poetry, fiction, and nonfiction, accompanied by SASE and submission form, which can be acquired by purchasing a book from the website.

[See the full listing]

Digital publishing is a lifeline for writers outside London – Tuesday November 8, 2016

There’s no wrong way to write. Countless blogs, workshops and lectures tell us that every writer’s journey is unique. Whether your story belongs on a shelf or the digital page, writing is a process of fumbling along, wrangling with self-doubt, second guessing and ploughing on anyway.

Knowing where to go once you’ve found your way through the platitude minefield with what you’ve written is just another part of that. The process of getting noticed in the publishing industry is a minefield all its own, to which the National Creative Writing Graduate Fair - organised by Comma Press and hosted by Manchester Metropolitan University - provided a map both in 2015, when I attended for the first time, and again this year. It is unlike any other writer’s convention I have been to, and the only one I am aware of offering an affordably priced ticket to an intense day of panels as well as the chance to meet some industry professionals.

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Carole Blake Open Doors Project founded in agent's memory – Tuesday November 8, 2016

The Blake Friedmann Agency has launched the Carole Blake Open Doors Project in memory of the “beloved” agent, who died suddenly in October. 

The programme will encourage candidates from a diverse range of backgrounds to enter the publishing industry. It will offer six days of work shadowing to a selected applicant over a two-week period, including funding for travel and four nights’ accommodation in London. Applicants from various backgrounds are being encouraged to apply, including those who have not been to college or university (like Blake), those from low income families, those from BAME backgrounds, and those who live outside the London.

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5 Writing Tips I Wish I'd Known Before I Wrote My First Novel – Monday November 7, 2016

So you’re writing a book. This is great news! YAY for you! Doesn’t it sound fun? And it is! Well, it is when it’s not sucking the life out of your soul. That's why I'm here with some writing tips and tricks — or life lessons I learned about writing during my career that I (sometimes) apply to my own work.

I’m working on my 18th novel right now — my first, Fools Rush In, came out in 2006, and my latest, On Second Thought, comes out in January 2017. In some respects, it’s gotten easier; in others, it’s gotten much harder. But each time I type “The End,” I cheer, dance around the office with my dogs, then open to another document and jot down some notes. That document is called “Before You Start Another Book” and contains notes to myself about how I screwed up and wasted time in my last manuscript, and how I’ll never ever do it again (or I will, but not for lack of knowledge). I'm sharing these tips with you, so hopefully you don't repeat the same mistakes.

Below are my top five, and jeesh, it would save so much time if I listened to myself.

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