Traditional Publishing

Writers' News

The Ends of the World: a call for submissions – Thursday August 25, 2016

" ‘We live in a time of social, economic and ecological unravelling,’ we wrote seven years ago in the Dark Mountain manifesto. ‘All around us are signs that our whole way of living is already passing into history.’ When we wrote those words they were, to many, highly debatable. They seem less debatable today. The world is changing faster than ever, and a sense of powerlessness is spreading. All over the world now, it seems, people are turning their minds to the big question: what happens now?"

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New Literary Agency Listing – Tuesday August 23, 2016

Handles: Fiction
Areas: Adventure; Crime; Erotic; Fantasy; Gothic; Historical; Horror; Literature; Mystery; Romance; Sci-Fi; Short Stories; Thrillers; Westerns
Markets: Adult; Children's; Youth
Treatments: Literary; Mainstream; Popular; Traditional

A full service literary agency for authors of fiction. We eagerly work with new and established authors to get their works published in both traditional and eBook formats. 

[See the full listing]

WME Acquires Literary Agency RWSG – Tuesday August 23, 2016

WME has acquired Rabineau Wachter Sanford & Gillett (RWSG) Literary Agency, the talent agency announced on Monday.

Founded in 2000, RWSG works with authors and writers of film and television to help bring their stories to the screen. Many iconic works of literature have been adapted through RWSG, including the upcoming films “The Girl on the Train” and “The Snowman,” and previously “Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close” and “Diary of a Wimpy Kid.” Its television projects include “The Leftovers,” “Olive Kitteridge,” and the upcoming “Berlin Station.”

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The authors writing erotic literature for young adults – Tuesday August 16, 2016

The phrase "mummy porn", used to describe Fifty Shades of Grey and its imitators, dismissed the predominantly female readership.

But the world of erotic literature is far wider than the phenomenon created by EL James and it appeals to many young adults.

Kay Jaybee writes a variety of erotica but is best known for her "more full-on, whips and chains" stories.

When she writes, she pictures her reader as someone like her, in her 40s.

"When I look at my sales figures, that's about 50% of my readership," Kay, who prefers to be referred to by her pen-name, tells Newsbeat.

"The other 50% are 18 to 26-year-olds. I guess they maybe do have a little bit more free time and may well be experimenting themselves.

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New Magazine Listing – Monday August 15, 2016

Publishes: Essays; Fiction; Nonfiction; Poetry; 
Areas include: Short Stories; 
Markets: Adult; 
Preferred styles: Literary

Nationally circulated literary review. Send 4-6 poems or essays or short stories up to 8,500 words. Address material to appropriate editor.

[See the full listing]

The Inevitable Death of Traditional Book Publishers – Saturday August 13, 2016

Traditional book publishers. They were once known as the titans of the book publishing industry. In the Baby Boomer era, self-publishing was an unknown concept. You needed a traditional publisher if you wanted the best chance to succeed with your book.

During that time, there was significantly less competition for publishers and authors, meaning more book sales for both parties.

Over time, traditional publishers (especially The Big 5) gradually started to exploit authors by offering lower royalties and seizing the author’s publishing rights.

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Twelfth short story contest winners announced – Thursday August 11, 2016

After much deliberation, is pleased to announce the winners and special commendations of its Twelfth International Short Story Contest, which opened in May 2015 and closed on May 1, 2016.

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The Global Golden Age for Independent Publishers Has Begun – Wednesday August 10, 2016

A number of years ago, I predicted the publishing and bookselling industries would follow a boutique model, with the large and small and little in between. Note: this also applies to other industries, in most part due to the digital age and today’s customer.

Book sales would be split between higher priced print books, for which the margin would be found, and low price digital books, which would provide the mass quantities. Bookstores would be split between the large chains with the budgets and economies of scale, and a wide range of independent bookstores that successfully built and became indispensable to their communities. Likewise, publishers would consist of the huge conglomerates with the advertising and bargaining power, and a vibrant independent publishing sector in touch and adaptive to the book buying community.

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Top 10 books writers should read – Wednesday August 10, 2016

Writing a novel from scratch, which is to say without training, was such an unexpected odyssey that I was prompted to recall the discoveries in my new book, Release the Bats – as much to remind myself where the power lay as to pass the keys on to others trying their luck. I didn’t read a lot before writing a novel, but I realise now that certain books helped set me up. Writing fiction means writing vibrant human characters, and luck is with us in terms of research, as we haven’t essentially changed since we came down from the trees. So the best grounding for a fiction writer must be one that explores human nature with gloves off. There’s nothing like literature from ancient Rome bemoaning consumer culture to show that nothing is new, or literature from Habsburg Italy telling how to hire nuns for sex from the mothers superior of convents to put Fifty Shades in perspective. Which is to say that if we haven’t figured ourselves out by now, there’s still time: we’re not going anywhere.

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How To Quit Your Job And Write A Novel – Wednesday August 10, 2016

Think that writing and publishing a novel is hard? Guess what: it’s ten times harder. The editor who bought The Regulars read roughly 400 submissions, via agents, the year she bought my book. She could buy a total of seven. A year. Most writers don’t sell their first novel. They sell their third or fourth. You have to submit a polished draft in order to get published, not a patchy first draft and certainly not a proposal. It. Is. Hard.

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