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Writers' News

What Does A Book Editor Do? Macmillan's Rhoda Belleza Has Some Insight On The Covetable Job

bustle.com – Thursday July 20, 2017

If you're anything like me, you're a readers who is super interested in book publishing, and what goes on behind the scenes of your favorite books. The books we hold in our hands have all had massive journeys — from the author sitting at their computers or notebooks banging out the words, to you holding that brand new crisp hardback in your hands.

There are literary agents and book packagers and so many more people who get a book from A to Z. But one of the most well known of these people is probably the book editor. These are the people who help take an author's work from good to great — the people who get it ready to hit the shelves (and, hopefully, the bestseller list.) But, whether you're just interested in learning more about the industry or you actually want to break in yourself, you might find yourself wondering what, exactly, a book editor's day to day looks like.

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New Literary Agency Listing

firstwriter.com – Thursday July 20, 2017

Handles: Fiction; Nonfiction
Areas: Arts; Culture; Historical; Politics; Sport
Markets: Academic; Adult
Treatments: Literary

Send query by email with cover letter, brief synopsis, and (if submitting an academic manuscript) an author CV. Responds to queries within 72 hours. Unsolicited mss will not be read or replied to, whether sent by post or email.

[See the full listing]

New Magazine Listing

firstwriter.com – Wednesday July 19, 2017

Publishes: Fiction; Poetry; 
Areas include: Short Stories; 
Markets: Adult; 
Preferred styles: Literary

Publishes poetry and fiction - often by people who have been marginalised, oppressed, or abused. Submit up to 6 poems and/or 1-3 short stories or one long story. Submit by post with SASE. Email submissions from overseas authors only.

[See the full listing]

10 Books On Writing To Read If You Don't Have The Time (Or Money) For A Workshop

bustle.com – Saturday July 15, 2017

Look, I know that in a perfect world every aspiring writer would have workshops full of peer reviewers, and infinite funding for their MFA, and a golden typewriter. But unfortunately, we live in an imperfect world, in which most writers work three or more day jobs and survive off of dry pasta and mug cakes. Never fear, though: even if you don't have the time or funds to enroll in a high-end writer's workshop, you can still pick up a few tips on how to write well. Writers love nothing more than to write about writing, after all. So here are a few books to read if you don't have time for a writing workshop.

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10 Writing Rules You Can (and Should) Break

publishersweekly.com – Friday July 14, 2017

Let me begin by reminding you—and myself, because of certain things we must routinely remind ourselves, too—that there are, in fact, no rules in fiction. Like, none. (Hell, in this context, the word rule should probably even appear in quotes, just as, say, “reality” has since—when?—1920? 1945? ’53? From November 8, 2016 on, for sure.) And also by reminding us that this general rulelessness is almost certainly a big part of what made us want to write the stuff in the first place. (Remember that joyful whoop that would surge through the classroom whenever Teacher announced that the next assignment was to be creative? Exactly.) Why, if we wanted to follow rules we would’ve leapt to become the low-to-mid-level employees that we’ve had to be anyway in order to buy ourselves all the time we need to learn how to not follow any goddamned rules for a change. Because, regardless of what all these rule enforcers like to tell themselves and others, breaking rules really means writing new ones of your own, which, of course, is way harder than simply following the ones other people came up with. But regardless of how you feel about rules, so long as you’re willing to break them now and then, here are 10 that you should absolutely have at:

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Seat 14C: Science Fiction short story competition launched

firstwriter.com – Friday July 14, 2017

On June 28, XPRIZE launched Seat 14C, an online science fiction anthology that offers a glimpse into a techno-optimistic future.  Many of the world’s leading sci-fi authors have contributed an original short story told from the perspective of one of the passengers on a flight that mysteriously lands in San Francisco, 20 years in the future, and they need your help.

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New Magazine Listing

firstwriter.com – Thursday July 13, 2017

Publishes: Fiction; Interviews; Nonfiction; Poetry; Reviews; 
Markets: Adult; 
Preferred styles: Literary

A print magazine until 2008, now publishes two online issues a year. Publishes fiction up to 5,000 words; nonfiction; poetry; artwork; and graphic narratives. Submit via online submission system only - no submissions by post or email. Reading periods run from September 1 to November 1, and January 15 to May 1. No work by current or former students of the university.

[See the full listing]

Vermont author says writing what you know isn’t always the best practice

mvtimes.com – Wednesday July 12, 2017

Jeffrey Lent takes a hammer to the popular advice for young writers, “Write what you know,” and shatters it. In his new book, “Before We Sleep,” 17-year-old Katey Snow goes on a journey of self-discovery. The story follows Katey, her mother Ruth, and her father Oliver in a tiny Vermont town in the 1960s as they grapple with the aftereffects of World War II.

Lent, who, to maintain transparency, is my uncle, has written numerous historical fiction books including “In the Fall” and “A Slant of Light.” He will be on a panel at “Islanders Write” on August 14, talking about how to write believable characters from a different gender. I sat down with him recently to talk about gender in literature, and why it’s important to go beyond what you know.

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How To Launch Your Freelance Writing Career

forbes.com – Wednesday July 12, 2017

There is lots of content out there about what a great career freelance writing is. And they make it look so easy. You just hook up with an agency, take gigs from job boards, sign up on “bid to write” sites, and life becomes wonderful – you can sit on the beach, just write, and make boatloads of money.

If this is what you think launching a freelance writing career is all about, then you may be looking in the wrong career direction.

Granted, freelance writing is in high demand, has a low barrier to entry and is suitable as a side gig for students or 9-to-5 workers. But, becoming a successful freelance writer and making good money involves lots of work and some lean times before you achieve a good income. Here are six strategies you can use that will build your business steadily.

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Got a great book idea but not a clue what to do? Here's a brilliant scheme to apply for

chroniclelive.co.uk – Wednesday July 12, 2017

The country’s biggest book publisher, Penguin Random House, is focusing on the North East as part of a nationwide search for untapped writing talent.

Newcastle is one of the three cities – along with Bristol and London – chosen for the second year of its WriteNow initiative.

This will result in 10 writers being chosen for a year of professional mentoring with the aim of getting their book published.

[Read the full article]

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