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Writers' News

The Book Inside You: The Business Of Selling It

boston.cbslocal.com – Thursday March 31, 2016

There is inherent passion in the written word, but there is also the business of selling it.

Enter Esmond Harmsworth, a founding partner of Zachary Shuster Harmsworth Literary Agency, which has offices in Boston and New York. He says every agency has a common ingredient – “You have to insanely love books.”

Harmsworth reads at least one full-length book a week, and the first 20 pages of another ten. He generally makes a quick decision.

[Read the full article]

New Publisher Listing

firstwriter.com – Thursday March 31, 2016

Publishes: Fiction; 
Areas include: Adventure; Culture; Fantasy; Gothic; Historical; Mystery; Romance; Translations; Women's Interests; 
Markets: Adult; 
Preferred styles: Commercial; Light; Literary; Mainstream; Niche; Popular; Positive; Progressive; Traditional

A full-service publisher offering traditional and new services for our authors to help them succeed and stand out in an ever-changing market. 

[See the full listing]

Budding writers in Scotland are invited by Scottish Book Trust to attend free writing workshops

dailyrecord.co.uk – Wednesday March 30, 2016

SECRETS AND CONFESSIONS will run from 30 March – 22 June, and in that time Scottish Book Trust wants to encourage the people of Scotland to confess their little white lies, dastardly deeds and hidden secrets.

People of all ages from across Scotland are invited to submit personal pieces of writing, which can be anything up to 1000 words long, about their own secret or confession. They can be written in a variety of different forms, such as a story, poem, song lyrics, a short play or sketch, a letter or even diary entry, and should be submitted via the Scottish Book Trust website.

[Read the full article]

New Magazine Listing

firstwriter.com – Wednesday March 30, 2016

Publishes: Poetry

Markets: Adult

Preferred styles: Literary

Poetry ezine. Submit 3-5 per reading period, pasted into the body of an email (no attachments) with cover letter and bio, up to 75 words.

[See the full listing]

Opportunity for writers and artists

firstwriter.com – Tuesday March 29, 2016

October 2016 will mark the first anniversary of Verbolatry newsletter, and to celebrate there will be a contest for humorous essays and cartoons on writing/publishing.

There are cash prizes to be won and publication in the newsletter. In addition to increasing the newsletter's readership, the organisers hope is that this contest will fill a void in the industry and encourage and empower those writers and artists who work in this under-represented genre to continue creating good writing and art.

[Read the full article]

ICM Partners Mints Nine Partners: Talent Agency Now Has 47

deadline.com – Tuesday March 29, 2016

ICM Partners has promoted nine agents to partner status, eight in Los Angeles and one in New York. The agents in need of new business cards: Jessica Lacy, Head of International and Independent Film; Dennis Ashley and Robert Gibbs, who have co-headed the West Coast urban music division; publishing agent Alexandra Machinist; television literary agents Erik Horine, Dan Norton and Pete Stone; Co-Head of Television Production Sean Freidin; and motion picture literary agent Doug Johnson.

[Read the full article]

Writing Secret No. 1 Is Keep Your Day Job

courant.com – Tuesday March 29, 2016

Here's everything you wanted to know about writing and publishing but were too afraid to ask: These are the questions that come up at the end after bookstore readings. I thought it made sense to address them all at once.

[Read the full article]

Inspiring writing advice from the greatest women authors

telegraph.co.uk – Monday March 28, 2016

Virginia Woolf (centre) died on this day in 1941. The pioneering modernist writer addressed the position of women after the war throughout her fiction, but with her collection of essays, A Room of One's Own, she contributed advice and thinking that still sounds fresh and relevant for women writing today. 

[Read the full article]

Call for Submissions

firstwriter.com – Monday March 28, 2016

The Write IdeaA Day in the Life of …(You)” Poem Title Prompt

 

“… Breakfast, Lunch, and Dinner; Morning, Afternoon, and Night.

Two lines for each word above, and a couplet of advice.

Tell us in a sonnet, how you live your life ...”

 

Write a Sonnet, It doesn’t have to rhyme, or not.

Write two lines for each word-time of the prompt.

The last two lines are your words of advice.

Tell us in a Sonnet, 14 lines, how you lead your life.

Entitle the poem “A Day in the Life of …(You)”.

Winners will be published in LONE STARS.

[Read the full article]

Writing Sci-Fi? First Understand How Elephants Aren't Dragonflies (Op-Ed)

space.com – Saturday March 26, 2016

Animals come in all different sizes, but the laws of physics mean that you can't just arbitrarily scale up a dragonfly to the size of an elephant and expect the body plan to result in a functioning creature. 

For one thing, mass increases much faster than other qualities like strength or surface area as you scale up a body, and so the legs and wings of an elephant-size dragonfly would have to be proportionately much larger to support the extra weight — and it's doubtful muscle power could be sufficient to propel such a creature into flight.

Moreover, insects are generally small because they rely on diffusion to distribute oxygen to interior cells instead of the active oxygen-pumping systems found in animals like mammals. This imposes an upper limit on just how big an insect can get. It's true that there were gigantic dragonflies — still not the size of elephants, however — during the Carboniferous period (as well as housecat-size cockroaches and other horrors), but the oxygen level in the atmosphere at the time was much higher, and that likely played a role in making such bodies viable.

Let's pause for a moment and give thanks for the fact that we don't have to live in a world of pet-size cockroaches and meter-long scorpions.

All of this presents an analogy for fiction. It's tempting to think of novels (the elephants) as scaled-up short stories, or short stories (the dragonflies) as miniaturized novels. But having written both 100-word drabbles as well as 200,000-word epic fantasies, I can assure you that's not the case.

[Read the full article]

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