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Writers' News

Publishers put up £5k prize for funny female writers

chortle.co.uk – Monday December 17, 2018

A new award for funny new female authors has been given a major boost.

The new Comedy Women in Print Prize, launched by Helen Lederer at this year’s Edinburgh Fringe, has joined forces with publisher HarperFiction, to award the winning aspiring novelist a publishing contract and a £5,000 advance.

The runner-up will receive a free place on the MA course in creative writing at the University of Hertfordshire.

[Read the full article]

Don’t fret, aspiring writers: You’re more qualified than you think

pe.com – Monday December 17, 2018

“How do I become a writer?” Authors hear it often. This question bubbles up in workshops and literary Q&A’s. Ironically, the folks asking are often already writing poems, essays, screenplays, or novels but somehow doubt that the work is “real” yet, pending the verdict of some external authority.

When I’m asked, the boring answer I give (similar if not identical to an answer offered by most writers I have known and read) is to read a lot and write a lot, then repeat the process over and over. This un-glamorous response either disappoints or quietly thrills. I watch the expression of the person if we are talking face-to-face. She may give a curious nod, as if to humor me. Often there is an insistent followup: “Well, sure,” one might go on, “but how do I publish my book/poetry collection/this article/this short story?”

Ah. That’s a different question. Strategies for getting published shift constantly in the evolving field of publication. But one cannot publish at all without writing first. So back to the first premise we go.

[Read the full article]

How to write your own auto-fiction book

harpersbazaar.com – Monday December 17, 2018

Everyone likes to think they've got a book in them (and, in many cases, that's notwhere it should stay), but the practical act of writing one is another story. Often, you might have had some experience which has made you want to put pen to paper, but perhaps you don't fancy a tell-all memoir that everyone you know will read. Enter auto-fiction, the not-so-new style of writing gaining serious traction in literary circles.

[Read the full article]

New Literary Agency Listing

firstwriter.com – Monday December 17, 2018

Handles: Fiction; Nonfiction
Areas: Autobiography; Biography; Business; Crime; Historical; Lifestyle; Psychology; Science; Suspense; Thrillers; Women's Interests
Markets: Adult
Treatments: Commercial; Literary; Popular

No science fiction (unless literary) and no fantasy or children's. Submit via website submission form.

[See the full listing]

Children's Publisher Kickstarts Its Book-for-Book Promise

publishersweekly.com – Sunday December 16, 2018

The brand-new California children’s publisher Bushel & Peck Books has raised more than $35,000 from nearly 400 backers on Kickstarter this month, inching toward the start-up’s goal of raising $75,000 to help produce its first season of children’s books. Originally, the campaign was scheduled to end on December 20, but the publisher decided this week to transition from a 30-day campaign window to a 60-day window on the crowdfunding platform. The Kickstarter campaign introduced the new publisher to the world, and the funds will jump-start its book production.

[Read the full article]

Religion Publishers Have Great Expectations for 2019

publishersweekly.com – Sunday December 16, 2018

A biography of the Dalai Lama, the memoir of a soldier involved in the accidental shooting of Pat Tillman, and a critical look at the Vatican are among the titles coming in 2019 from religion and spirituality publishers.

Leading religion lists next year are books that address classic topics, as well as those that cluster around current events.

[Read the full article]

Big Publishers Work On Getting Their Houses in Order

publishersweekly.com – Sunday December 16, 2018

After accumulating assets, it is not unusual for publishers to look for ways to manage those properties more effectively. Such was the case again in 2018, especially late in the year when two of the Big Five trade publishers made significant adjustments. The most wide-ranging realignment was the merger of the Crown Publishing Group into the Random House Publishing Group. The reorg, announced in October, put both groups under Random House head Gina Centrello, with Crown president and publisher Maya Mavjee leaving the company at the end of the year. On December 7, Centrello announced how Crown will be structured as part of Random House.

[Read the full article]

New Publisher Listing

firstwriter.com – Friday December 14, 2018

Publishes: Fiction; Nonfiction; 
Areas include: Autobiography; Travel; 
Markets: Adult

Publishes fiction, travel and memoir. Welcomes book proposals and queries from both authors and agents. See website for full guidelines.

[See the full listing]

Paragraphing—Yes, You Heard Me

By G. Miki Hayden
Instructor at Writer's Digest University online and private writing coach

firstwriter.com – Wednesday December 12, 2018

I wouldn’t think paragraphing could be a mysterious business, but apparently so.

I wish I had an electronic rubber stamp that said, “Break your paragraphs”, because writers need to do exactly that. My students, in particular, need to do just that.

[Read the full article]

Robin Robertson: 'Writing poetry has very little to do with the intellect'

theguardian.com – Saturday December 8, 2018

Robin Robertson is an acclaimed poet who has won all three of the Forward poetry prizes. His latest work, The Long Take, a narrative poem, is set in the years immediately after the second world war. The story unfolds in New York, San Francisco and, most importantly, Los Angeles, and follows Walker, a traumatised D-day veteran from Nova Scotia, as he tries to piece his life together just as the American dream is beginning to fray at its edges. It was shortlisted for the Booker prize and, last month, won the Goldsmiths prize for fiction, awarded to works that “open up new possibilities for the novel form”. Robertson also works as an editor at Jonathan Cape, where he publishes, among many others, Michael Ondaatje, Alice Oswald and Adam Thorpe.

[Read the full article]

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