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Writers' News

26 Tips from Editors on How to Get Published

forbes.com – Sunday September 22, 2019

As a journalist, writing coach and magazine editor, I have worked with hundreds of writers and editors. 

Most recently, I have interviewed dozens of editors for the podcast for the American Society of Journalists and Authors that I host and curate, ASJA Direct: Inside Intel on Getting Published and Paid Well. The podcast is a free member’s benefit for ASJA members (and available for non-members for a fee).

Here are the top tips I’ve collected from editors over the years. 

[Read the full article]

Bloody Scotland crime writing festival sets out to champion new writers

scotsman.com – Friday September 20, 2019

Scotland has so many book festivals readers are spoiled for choice. But for crime fiction fans, this weekend is particularly special, as Bloody Scotland arrives in Stirling for the eighth time to bring authors and book lovers together at around 40 events over three days.

On Friday night, the winner of the 2019 McIlvanney Prize for Crime Novel of the Year will be announced (see panel, right, for The Scotsman’s reviews of the shortlisted titles). There is also a new prize for debut authors. Bob McDevitt, director of Bloody Scotland, said: “The festival is always looking for new ways to discover and promote new writers… Publishing is a tough old world these days and anything that gives a bit of profile to a new writer is a good thing.”

[Read the full article]

New York academic to open London's 'first co-working space for writers'

thebookseller.com – Thursday September 19, 2019

American academic Sharon Fulton will launch Clean Prose, "London’s first co-working space designed specifically for writers", next month. 

The newly revedeveloped three-floor property will open its doors to founding members on 1st October, before its official launch on 24th October in artistic collaboration with the cultural anthology Postscript to create a unique photoshoot and literary panel.

 “Located in the heart of Shoreditch and Old Street at 2 Charlotte Road, the three-storey building offers a different atmosphere on each floor,” according to academic-turned-entrepreneur Fulton.

Fulton, who studied and taught at Columbia University in New York for her PhD and Post-Doc, said: “I finished teaching there in 2016 and tutoring and teaching all over New York, in libraries as well, I wanted to keep teaching literature. I am looking for something but found writing by myself quite isolating. I would write ‘out’ in the Southbank Centre or a library but it’s frustrating because you don’t meet other writers in this way. I love London but there was nothing like this in London. I had this idea of opening a co-working space for writers and wanted it to be more than co-working so I developed this idea of it having more than one storey.”

[Read the full article]

David A Goodman Re-Elected WGA President, Agency Standoff Likely to Continue

thewrap.com – Tuesday September 17, 2019

The Writers Guild of America will stay the course on its ongoing fight against top Hollywood agencies and packaging fees, as its membership has reelected President David A. Goodman to another term after a heavily contested campaign against challenger Phyllis Nagy.

It was a landslide victory for Goodman, receiving 77% of 5,677 votes counted with 4,395 votes to Nagy’s 1,292. He will continue to serve alongside Executive Director David Young, Vice President Marjorie David, and new Secretary-Treasurer Michele Mulroney, who has previously served as a board and negotiating committee member.

[Read the full article]

How soap operas influence my saga novels by Glenda Young

femalefirst.co.uk – Tuesday September 17, 2019

I’ve been a fan of Coronation Street since before I can remember. It was the show I used to watch with my mum and grandma, all three of us huddled on the sofa. My grandma and I used to love Elsie Tanner, the wicked woman of Weatherfield, no better than she ought to be. She had a string of men in her past and I loved the naughtiness of Elsie, the cheek of her.

I went on to write TV Tie-In books about Coronation Street for ITV. I also contributed to the official ITV Corrie website, to their official magazine and to various one-off ITV publications about the soap. I have also written unofficial fan books. In addition, I set up and now edit the Coronation Street Blog, a fan site written by and for fans. It’s been online since 2007 and remains unique, a labour of love. And I’ve been writing online Corrie weekly updates since 1995. So being a fan of the show and writing about it is in my blood. It comes naturally to me. You could say I’m steeped in soap opera. I know their twists and turns, their cliff-hangers and signposts. Most of all, I know their women.   

[Read the full article]

New Magazine Listing

firstwriter.com – Tuesday September 17, 2019

Publishes: Articles; Features; Fiction; Nonfiction; Poetry;
Areas include: Short Stories; Westerns;
Markets: Adult

Publishes fiction, nonfiction, and poetry about the American West. Looks for themes of open country, unforgiving nature, struggles to survive and settle the land, freedom from authority, cooperation with fellow adventurers, and other experiences that human beings encounter on the frontier. Send submissions by email. See website for full guidelines.

[See the full listing]

'I have to put my phone in the wardrobe': how do authors deal with social media?

theguardian.com – Monday September 16, 2019

Zadie Smith “can’t stand the phones”. Nick Laird pointedly owns a phone that’s not smart. Brett Easton Ellis despises Instagram as “that fake place” while Jonathan Coe has said he finds being on Twitter “a bit like writing in a virtual cafe”. Mark Haddon announced a retreat from Twitter when The Porpoise was published because of “a growing sense that it was detrimentally affecting the way I both looked at and thought about the world around me”, but has posted every week since. Ayòbámi Adébáyò, author of Stay With Me, keeps two mobile phones, and when she writes, she hides the one with all the apps in the wardrobe. Authors can have an uneasy time with social media; “always twitching the sleeve with its wants and needs”, as Robert Macfarlane puts it (at which point, he says, he shuts it down for a few hours). So how do writers manage – or deploy – the distractions?

[Read the full article]

New Publisher Listing

firstwriter.com – Monday September 16, 2019

Publishes: Fiction; Nonfiction; Poetry;
Areas include: Short Stories;
Markets: Adult;
Preferred styles: Literary

Publishes short stories, poetry, nonfiction, and literary fiction on themes such as social justice, racism, discrimination, gender equality, LGBTQ concerns, immigration, poverty and homelessness. Submit via online submission system. $5 submission fee.

[See the full listing]

Beginners guide for writing a novel

thriveglobal.com – Saturday September 14, 2019

“Every secret of a writer’s soul, every experience of his life, every quality of his mind, is written large in his work” ~ Virginia Woolf

Becoming an author can change your life—not to mention the impact the author’s voice has on the readers. However, writing a novel is not a piece of cake. It is better to call it quits then completing a book. It happens when you run out of ideas, or your own story bores you, or you become overwhelmed by the scope of finishing what you started, compels you to quit.

For a beginner, writing can seem daunting, but if you have a passion to write your own story and know the ways to make the process easier, you can make it to the end of your novel. So without further ado, let’s discuss ten tips which can keep you motivated till the end of your project.

[Read the full article]

The Pleasures and Frustrations of Collaborative Fiction Writing

conversations.e-flux.com – Saturday September 14, 2019

Writing a novel has traditionally been understood as a solitary and often grueling affair. Novels are frequently taken as the detailed expression of a single worldview or sensbility, even if this is distributed across multiple characters and plot points. In the New Yorker, fiction writer Ceridwen Dovey profiles three writing collectives that explode the traditonal view of the novel as an individualistic enterprise. These collectives (one working in romance fiction, another in erotic fiction, and the other in historical fiction) have each published multiple successful novels composed through elaborate collaborative writing methods. Together they demonstrate that writing doesn’t have to be the exclusive province of the solitary tortured “genius.” Check out an excerpt from the piece below.

[Read the full article]

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