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Prometheus Sells Fiction Imprints to Start Publishing

publishersweekly.com – Tuesday November 13, 2018

Prometheus Books, which is nearing its 50th anniversary, has sold its two genre imprints to Start Publishing.

Founded in 1969 by the late Paul Kurtz in Amherst, N.Y. to publish provocative, progressive, and independent nonfiction, Prometheus expanded into fiction in 2005 with the launch of Pyr, which focuses on science fiction and fantasy novels. In 2011 it added the crime fiction imprint Seventh Street Books. Pyr has a backlist of 170 titles, while Seventh Street's backlist stands at about 90.

[Read the full article]

30 Words Of Wisdom From Writers, To Inspire You Through The Rest Of NaNoWriMo

bustle.com – Tuesday November 13, 2018

If you’re one of the many writers trying your hand at NaNoWriMo this year, (that’s National Novel Writing Month, for the uninitiated) then you well know we’re approximately half way through the month of November — and hopefully, you’re well on your way to completing your goal of 50,000 words. As a repeated NaNoWriMo hopeful myself, I know what a complete drag that halfway point can be: by this time the adrenaline of starting SOMETHING BIG (aka: your novel) has worn off, your caffeine tolerance has skyrocketed, and your non-writer friends have gone from vaguely supportive to disbelief that you’re actually staying in to write all weekend AGAIN. Maybe you’re a little behind on your word count, or on sleep, or — most likely — both, and the end of November seems both too soon and impossibly far away.

From one writer to another, let me tell you: this is hardly atypical. Whether you’re attempting to write your novel in one frantic NaNoWriMo burst or you’ve been drafting it for years, I’d venture to guess that most writers suffer from creative fatigue (and, you know, finger cramps) in the middle of any project — no matter how ambitious. And lucky for you, not only have many of these successful writers lived to tell about it, they’ve offered plenty of words of wisdom for their fellow aspiring novelists.

Below you’ll find some inspiring words of wisdom — and great writing advice — from writers, designed to power you through the rest of your NaNoWriMo.

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Sharing Your Writing For The First Time Can Be Tough — Here's 11 Tips For Getting Through It

bustle.com – Tuesday November 13, 2018

There comes a time in every writer's life when they must do the unthinkable: allow someone else to read their writing. It happens to the best of us. Unless you are writing in a private diary, which you then plan to burn in a cleansing bonfire before burying the remains deep in the secret heart of the woods, you will eventually have to share your writing with someone. A story or an essay isn't complete until it has a reader. But sharing your writing for the very first time can be an intimidating prospect. This poem/screenplay/blog post has been your baby for weeks or months or years, and you don't want to shove it into the cruel outside world all on its own. So here are a few tips for how to share your writing for the very first time, no matter what you've written.

Of course, the first step is to write something you feel a little bit proud of (or, failing that, something you're not too horrifically embarrassed by). It doesn't need to be perfect or polished or finished or even especially original. It just has to be done enough that you feel comfortable (if nervous) letting someone have a peek:

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The Radicalization of Bedtime Stories

theatlantic.com – Monday November 12, 2018

More than 200 years ago, when books for children first became common, they delivered simple moral lessons about, for instance, cleanliness and the importance of prayer. Today, story time is still propelled by moral forces, but the issues have gotten a good deal more sophisticated.

In recent years, publishers have put out children’s books with political undertones and activist calls to action on topics ranging from Islamophobia to race to gender identity to feminism. “The trend has definitely exploded in recent years with the social-justice books and the activism books,” says Claire Kirch, a senior correspondent at Publishers Weekly who has been covering the book industry for 15 years.

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Publica wants to free publishers and authors from Amazon using the blockchain

thebookseller.com – Saturday November 10, 2018

Publica is a new publishing platform that using blockchain and cryptocurrency technology to innovate how books are funded, distributed, bought, and read. For readers, libraries and institutions Publica offers “books without borders” via an ereader-wallet app for digital book ownership, which is portable to any device. For authors and publishers, it offers personalised online storefronts, designed to their own business models and at their own prices, with their book sales cryptographically protected by a global peer-to-peer blockchain network.

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A Very Profitable Quarter for Four Big Publishers

publishersweekly.com – Saturday November 10, 2018

If the U.S. publishing business is mired in a slow-growth environment, you wouldn’t know it from the third-quarter results of four of the country’s largest trade houses. All three of the companies that reported sales as well as earnings saw profits grow at a faster rate than revenue, improving operating margins at the publishers.

Strong backlist sales were an important factor in boosting revenue and profits in the quarter, especially at HarperCollins. Earnings before interest, taxes, depreciation, and amortization (EBITDA) rose nearly 42% at the company compared to the third quarter of 2017, and Susan Panuccio, CFO of HC parent company News Corp, said this was largely due to strong backlist sales led by The Subtle Art of Not Giving a F*ck and The Hate U Give. Backlist sales contributed 55% of total revenue in the most recent quarter, Panuccio noted. Overall, sales were led by a better-than-expected performance in the U.S., she added.

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Vary Sentence Structure

By G. Miki Hayden
Instructor at Writer's Digest University online and private writing coach

firstwriter.com – Saturday November 10, 2018

This past week I edited a novel written in a way meant to emulate the method used by a handful of successful mystery writers.

"He took the stairs down. He walked into the kitchen. He stood at the refrigerator. He got out a pitcher of cold water."

[Read the full article]

Major Publishers are seeing strong gains with audiobooks

goodereader.com – Friday November 9, 2018

Major publishers such as Simon and Schuster, HarperCollins, Hachette and Penguin Random House have all reported that digital audiobooks continue to soar, while ebooks still generate meaningful revenue, although sales are soft.

HarperCollins recently stated that digital audiobook sales also had another great quarter, up 55% over the first period of fiscal 2018. The growth in audio offset soft e-book sales, resulting in a 12% increase in total digital sales in the quarter; ebook and digital audio represented 22% of total HC revenue in the period.

[Read the full article]

5 helpful books for National Novel Writing Month

syracuse.com – Wednesday November 7, 2018

If you've ever wanted to write a book, this is the month to begin! November is National Novel Writing Month. NaNoWriMo, as it is often referred to, is an artistic writing project online that occurs every November. People who participate in this write a 50,000 word manuscript during the month.

Take part in this project by visiting nanowrimo.org and learn more about it by checking out books from your local library or by logging on to www.onlib.org.

[Read the full article]

Will the chatbot novel become a new trend for book publishers?

econsultancy.com – Tuesday November 6, 2018

eBooks and audiobooks are now consumed in their droves, and yet they remain a mere alternative to the traditional paper or hardback book.

And when it comes to marketing, apart from a few juggernauts like J.K Rowling (more on her later), not many authors receive the investment or resources needed for large scale digital or social campaigns.

So, how do publishers tell (and sell) stories to a digital audience? American author James Patterson is the latest author to experiment with a new strategy. He has teamed up with Facebook to release an ‘interactive’ version of his latest novel, ‘The Chef’, on the Messenger platform.

Is it a marketing gimmick, or a glimpse at how we will consume and enjoy books in future? Here’s more.

[Read the full article]

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