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Greek publisher Papadopoulos sets up UK children’s imprint

thebookseller.com – Friday January 4, 2019

Papadopoulos Publishing, an Athens-based publisher that has been running for more than 70 years, is setting up an imprint in the UK to publish children’s books.

Faros Books will be based in London and will launch in February and will publish 10 titles in the first year, 10-14 in the following year and the aim is to publish 15-20 books in 2024. Most will be translated from Greek.

M.d. of Papadopoulos Publishing Ioannis Papadopoulos said he wanted to launch a business in London because the city is a centre of English language publishing across continents, and is closer to Athens than alternatives such as New York.

[Read the full article]

5 Tips For Young And Emerging Writers

wamu.org – Thursday January 3, 2019

Writers: how often have you been told to “write what you know”?

Generic writing advice is so often repeated it’s become a joke in the New Yorker. But do young or emerging writers feel boxed-in when they hear the same lessons over and over again that prioritize certain kinds of writing styles? Today on The Kojo Nnamdi Show, we’ll explore what it takes to write fiction, and what resources the Washington region has for new writers. One of our guests, Zachary Clark, leads 826DC, a nonprofit chapter that provides writing support to young Washingtonians.

Check out Zachary’s writing advice, and leave your own in the comments section!

[Read the full article]

60 Inspiring Quotes About Writing from the World's Greatest Authors

inc.com – Tuesday January 1, 2019

If you've been following my column you'll notice I like to write about the art and craft of writing. Most recently, I've covered topics such as freewriting, Stan Lee's advice for storytelling, strategies LinkedIn Top Voices uses to attract more readers, and my advice for breaking out of a creative rut and getting more writing done.

But if you're like me, you might find the need to dip into sources of inspiration from time to time, something to loosen your mental gears and limber up your writing limbs in the hope that you'll be able to write prose that inspires, educates, and, if that's your goal, entertains.

[Read the full article]

7 Quick (and Free) Ways to Find Inspiration and Be More Creative in 2019

inc.com – Monday December 31, 2018

'Tis the season for setting fresh resolutions for the new year! 

A few days of downtime over the holiday season gave me the space to think about my writing and publishing goals for the upcoming year. Lingering in the back of my mind, however, was the gnawing awareness that, to achieve my goals, I'll need to grapple with a powerful but invisible force working against me. It's a force Steve Pressfield gave a name to in his classic book on creativityThe War of Art: the "Resistance."

"Resistance" can come in many forms: It can be procrastination, fed by an array of distractions, like social media. It can be the heavy gravitational pull of the day job that pays my bills and allows me to support my family. Or, sometimes, "Resistance" is the feeling that the well of ideas and inspiration bubbling in my mind that I draw from when I need to write something has simply dried up.

I've written before about this topic, and have offered all forms of advice gleaned from the pros I've spoken to on my podcast about finding creative inspiration, developing better habits, and becoming a more productive writer. While I still recommend dipping into those strategies -- reading books on the craft of writing, experimenting with freewriting exercises, committing to a time and place to write every day -- there are a few other personal hacks I like to use whenever I need to summon my creative muse and -- to put it less poetically --pull my reluctant body back into a chair and place my hands on the keyboard again.

So here they are: Seven quirky, quick --and entirely free --ways to find inspiration and break out of a creative slump:

[Read the full article]

How paperback redesigns give publishers a second chance at winning readers

washingtonpost.com – Sunday December 30, 2018

A paperback release is a second chance of sorts. If for some reason a book’s hardcover design doesn’t resonate with readers, publishers have an opportunity to go back to the drawing board and reinvigorate the vibe of the book, not to mention show off any fancy awards that might have been bestowed.

While most of us just see a pretty cover, a lot goes on behind the scenes. We asked designers and creative directors to tell us how three hardback-to-paperback redesigns came together.

[Read the full article]

The Complete Comedy Writer, by Dave Cohen

chortle.co.uk – Saturday December 29, 2018

Dave Cohen’s book about comedy writing doesn’t have any of the answers. But it does have a lot of questions – and that is probably more useful to an aspiring scribe trying to figure out what’s wrong with their script or in need of a bit of inspiration.

For anyone putting ‘become a sitcom writer’ on their list of new year resolutions, there are plenty of pointers here to focus the mind: from considering the underpinning meaning of what the show’s actually about to figuring out the personality flaws of the central character which means they won’t get what they think they want - let alone what they really want.

[Read the full article]

Advice for depicting an interesting setting in your writing

theboar.org – Saturday December 29, 2018

Setting is an incredibly important part of writing but it can often be overlooked. Without setting, your characters are stuck in a nameless limbo. However, sometimes conveying the setting you are imagining can be a bit of a challenge.

World building can be the glue that holds the story together in some cases, especially in science fiction and fantasy. Start by making notes on the kind of society you wish to create. Is the environment hostile, creating a ‘survival of the fittest’ society? Are the citizens conservative or liberal? Or is it a more grounded culture, a capitalist one, or one that embraces the arts? Think about whether your main character fits in with your culture or if they are an outcast. How your protagonist views the world they inhabit will alter how your descriptions and settings are portrayed.

If you’re still stuck on how to begin, check out other critically acclaimed and well-known writers and see how they write setting. The maxim ‘write what you know’ can be a good tip for some writers, especially those who write contemporary and realistic stories. However, sticking to this maxim can limit your writing at times.

For an extra challenge, try reading and writing in a different genre than you’re used to. This can really help you get out of a writing block and come up with new ways of describing setting.

[Read the full article]

Going Into 2019, The Publishing Industry Is Excited About Audio

forbes.com – Friday December 28, 2018

Audiobooks have been a popular sector of the publishing industry for years now thanks to the ubiquity of the smartphone, but 2018 was the year that distribution channels caught up: Google, Walmart, and Instaread all started selling audiobooks within the last year, and Kobo wasn't too far ahead of them. Intermediaries are making audiobook distribution easier too, like Findaway Voices, which ushers self-published authors' audiobooks onto the Apple Books marketplace and its 45% royalties. With even more audiobook accessibility, 2019 is poised to keep the audio train rolling, and no publisher wants to be left behind.

[Read the full article]

Happy Verbs

By G. Miki Hayden
Instructor at Writer's Digest University online and private writing coach

firstwriter.com – Thursday December 27, 2018

Well, I don’t think the verbs are actually happy. I only said that to attract your attention. But verbs do have moods. And I used the word “moods” to draw your attention, too. But it’s true that verbs have moods, though we also call them modes.

[Read the full article]

Book industry booms as children catch the reading bug

newshub.co.nz – Thursday December 27, 2018

When it came to kid's presents this year one of the most popular items in Santa's sack was a new book.

Publishers are celebrating an industry boom with children's titles flying off the shelves.

The increase in sales is being put down to a number of factors, including a higher quality of offerings on the shelves.

[Read the full article]

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