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Writers' News

New Literary Agent Listing

firstwriter.com – Wednesday August 28, 2019

ADULT > Fiction > Novels

  • Mystery; Romance; Thrillers; Women's Fiction

CHILDREN'S

  • Fiction > Picture Books
  • Nonfiction > Picture Books

YOUNG ADULT

  • ​Fiction > Novels
  • Nonfiction > Books

[See the full listing]

Want to Learn How to ‘Nail the Jelly of Reality to the Wall’?

nytimes.com – Tuesday August 27, 2019

A well-formed sentence, Joe Moran writes in his humane and witty guide to meaning-making, “is a cure, however fleeting, for human loneliness.” We all write more sentences now than ever, but how hard do we think about the shape of these etheric objects? A good sentence is a considerate gift; or maybe it’s an easeful, mapless walk with your reader, through a new city — but it might also be a high-wire act (audience agog for disaster). Moran’s book contains many such metaphors for the sentence, and at least one for figurative language itself: “Metaphor is how we nail the jelly of reality to the wall.” Is the sentence a transaction, or is it an artifact? Polished performance or open invitation? “First You Write a Sentence” is a “muted love letter” to the form, arguing in its genially opinionated way for sentences that make our lives more democratic and more pleasurable.

[Read the full article]

New Magazine Listing

firstwriter.com – Tuesday August 27, 2019

Publishes: Essays; Fiction; Nonfiction; Poetry; 
Areas include: Autobiography; Short Stories; 
Markets: Adult; 
Preferred styles: Literary

Publishes poetry and prose, in English and Spanish, by writers from Canada, the US, and Mexico. Publishes poems and poem sequences, creative nonfiction, fiction, memoir, flash fiction, essays and vignettes. Also eager to publish longer work. Send submissions by email.

[See the full listing]

A grab bag of common writing mistakes to ponder

startribune.com – Saturday August 24, 2019

Lest you come home from the Minnesota State Fair empty-handed, here’s a grab bag of parting gifts — a collection of common writing mistakes and ways to correct them.

[Read the full article]

How the UK production boom is changing the way London’s literary agents are doing business

screendaily.com – Friday August 23, 2019

UK literary agents are navigating an unprecedented boom in UK production, with demand for their writing and directing clients at fever pitch.

“My clients are so busy at the moment,” said one literary agent at a major London agency. “Everyone is scrambling around to hire [the best talent], it’s very difficult for producers to get to them.”

The majority of the growth is in the high-end TV sector, the production of which tends to tie up clients for much longer than film. (The inward investment feature boom is doing a good job on its own of employing UK actors and crew). Netflix alone said it has has shot some 40 productions in the UK this year, while the major broadcasters are responding to the competition from the US streamers by making increasingly larger-scope series.

[Read the full article]

New Publisher Listing

firstwriter.com – Thursday August 22, 2019

Publishes: Fiction; 
Areas include: Mystery; Romance; Suspense; Thrillers; Women's Interests; 
Markets: Adult

Send query by email with synopsis as attachment. See website for full list of editors' emails and interests and approach one editor only.

[See the full listing]

Graphic Novels Take Off With Young Readers

wsj.com – Sunday August 18, 2019

Graphic novels aimed at younger readers are skipping the superheroes and taking on serious subjects like mental health and body image, setting off a boom that is bolstering the children’s publishing industry.

These graphic novels are resonating with children and young adults and making readers out of some youngsters who had ditched books for their cellphones. Publishers including Penguin Random House and HarperCollins, a unit of Wall Street Journal parent News Corp., are launching graphic-novel lines aimed at those ages 13 to 18, as well as the juvenile market of readers 7 to 12 years old.

[Read the full article]

Why Beatrix Potter Ended Up Self-Publishing The Tale of Peter Rabbit

mentalfloss.com – Friday August 16, 2019

The Tale of Peter Rabbit was Beatrix Potter’s first book—and is still her best known. But had the beloved author not had the confidence to publish the book on her own terms, we might not have ever known her name (or Peter Rabbit's) today.

The origin of Peter Rabbit dates back in 1893, when Potter wrote the beginnings of what would become her iconic children’s book in a letter she sent to Noel Moore, the ailing five-year-old son of Annie Carter Moore, Potter's friend and former governess. “I don't know what to write to you, so I shall tell you a story about four little rabbits whose names were—Flopsy, Mopsy, Cottontail and Peter,” the story began.

[Read the full article]

Capital Crime launches New Voices Award

thebookseller.com – Friday August 16, 2019

Capital Crime festival will host the inaugural New Voices Awards to champion the next generation of talent in the crime and thriller community next month. 

In association with D H H Literary Agency, the awards will give entrants the chance to have three opening chapters of their debut novel read by agents, publishers and readers, who will then vote for their favourites.

Capital Crime co-founder and D H H founder David Headley, said: "At D H H we’re always on the lookout for talented new authors. The New Voices Award is an exciting competition that gives readers the power to help identify new talent. It promises to be a brilliant platform for aspiring writers."

[Read the full article]

Cheating on my crime series to write a romcom on the side

irishtimes.com – Tuesday August 13, 2019

About five years ago, I found myself with a dark secret. Instead of writing about the murders, lies and traumas I was contracted for, with my Paula Maguire crime series, I was sneaking off behind that book’s back. I was writing about love, flirtation, a turning-30 life crisis. I was making jokes about Beyoncé and online dating. I was writing….a romcom.

Chick lit. Rom com. Commercial women’s fiction. We don’t have a good way to describe this kind of book. When I say I write crime fiction, people get it right away. But when I say I also write another kind of book, under the name Eva Woods, I start to stumble. “It’s like romance,” I might say. “But it deals with serious issues.” Or: “It’s called uplit now.” Turns out no one outside publishing has heard this term, coined to describe a kind of sad-but-happy book in the vein of Eleanor Oliphant Is Completely Fine, or my own How To Be Happy. My agent describes the tone as “laughter through tears”, and the books often cover death, abuse, serious illness, suffering. Despite this they are extremely likely to be given a pastel-coloured cover.

[Read the full article]

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