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Thought poetry was dead? The 'Instapoets' raking it in online would beg to differ

theage.com.au – Saturday November 2, 2019

Paterson, Poe, Plath – would they have resisted plugging their work on Instagram? Meet the Millennials sending their pop verse viral – and generating sales that prove poetry’s demise has been exaggerated.

Standing on a Persian carpet before a crowd in Bankstown in Sydney’s west, swaying to the rhythm of her own words, Canadian performance poet Rupi Kaur recited Broken English. It’s a poem about the shame she once felt over her Sikh mother’s inability to speak the language. The 300 mainly immigrant Australian women at this, the Bankstown Poetry Slam, were mesmerised. Borrowing from the 1950s beatnik poetry tradition, the audience snapped their fingers in appreciation, then hollered and cheered as Kaur’s performance came to a close. “You can go on forever,” someone from the floor proclaimed, transfixed as much by the cadence of Kaur’s voice as by her verse.

It was May 2017, and the then 25-year-old Canadian dubbed the “queen of the Instapoets” and the “Oprah of her generation” was in town as a keynote speaker at the Sydney Writers’ Festival. Accompanying her on the visit was her publisher Kirsty Melville, whose American company is credited with a global revival of interest in poetry through the publication of books by young women like Kaur, now 27, who have both a way with words and a big social media presence. In Kaur’s case that means 3.8 million Instagram followers, who feast on a feed that alternates between selfies and sparse but digestible poetry.

[Read the full article]

Tyler Hayes Guest Post–"Rescued From the Trunk"

locusmag.com – Thursday October 31, 2019

The week before I got an offer on my debut novel, I made the decision to give up on it.

The Imaginary Corpse was a labor of love: a noir-flavored fantasy cobbled together from childhood memories, my experiences in therapy, and a million literary and ludological ancestors. Writing it felt right in a way that no other manuscript had before. I built this world in a matter of hours, the outline in a matter of days. Rarely did I have to stop and think during the drafting process (editing, of course, was another story). It’s the book of my heart. Writing it required years of working on myself, finding my real voice under all the received wisdom about writing, and trying very, very hard not to be afraid.

I also couldn’t seem to sell it for the longest time.

Out of all the books I’ve written, the queries and pitches for The Imaginary Corpse were by far the best-received, but all that means is that I finally got partial manuscript requests. I also got partial manuscript rejections, and all of them said essentially the same thing as the rejections of my initial query packet, just in more detail: This is good. But I, a literary agent, have no idea where I’d sell it.

[Read the full article]

BookLife Launches Paid Review Service for Self-Pubbed Books

publishersweekly.com – Wednesday October 30, 2019

BookLife, Publishers Weekly's website and monthly supplement dedicated to self-publishing, has launched BookLife Reviews, a paid reviews service open exclusively to self-published authors.

BookLife Reviews will be written by Publishers Weekly reviewers, but remain distinct from Publishers Weekly reviews. The service is designed to help self-published authors reach readers by providing them with credible and reliable assessments of their work from reviewers with expertise in their genres and styles.

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UEA to mark 50 years of creative writing MA with international programme

thebookseller.com – Wednesday October 30, 2019

The University of East Anglia is marking 50 years of its pioneering creative writing MA with a programme of events including a new international chair of creative writing position occupied in turn by five prominent writers from around the world.

Founded by Malcolm Bradbury and Angus Wilson in 1970, the course was the first of its kind in the UK and counted Ian McEwan as its debut student. UEA will now mark the anniversary with a national and international programme of events, activities and initiatives to run across the 2020/2021 academic year.

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New Magazine Listing

firstwriter.com – Tuesday October 29, 2019

Publishes: Fiction;
Areas include: Fantasy; Short Stories;
Markets: Adult;
Preferred styles: Experimental

Publishes fantasy, magical realism, and experimental fiction, between 500 and 5,000 words.

[See the full listing]

New Literary Agent Listing: Catherine Cho

firstwriter.com – Tuesday October 29, 2019

Fiction: Family Saga; High Concept; Literary; Magical Realism; Romance; Science Fiction; Speculative Fiction; Upmarket

Nonfiction: History; Narrative Nonfiction; Psychology; Science; Social Issues

[See the full listing]

Literary Magazine 'Bad Nudes' Releases Its First Anthology

thelinknewspaper.ca – Monday October 28, 2019

Bad Books, the sister press of the quarterly literary magazine Bad Nudes, just released the publication’s first anthology.

But no, these are not your typical nudes. Since 2016, Bad Nudes “has been pairing dynamic and innovative writing with boundary-pushing design.”

Avid Bad Nudes readers will be able to revisit writers who particularly made a mark on the magazine. The anthology features new poetry and prose by authors whose contributions made a significant mark at the publication. It was designed and laid out by Sandy Spink.

The anthology, launched on Oct. 20, will be Bad Nudes‘s first print exclusive.

Fawn Parker, co-founder and poetry editor, feels that the anthology gives the magazine a chance to publish its milestones.

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How to write the perfect approach email

artshub.co.uk – Monday October 28, 2019

No matter what kind of art you produce, you’ll definitely have to try and get someone interested in it at some point. This might mean getting in touch with a gallery owner if you’re a painter, a producer if you’re in the performing arts or film, or a publisher if you write books. And odds are, you’re going to do so via email. 

With that in mind, I caught up with Kathryn Burnett to talk about how to write (and how not to write) an approach email. Kathryn runs The Writing Room (an Auckland space for writers to work, hang out and connect with other writers) and has been a screenwriter for 25 years and a playwright and writing coach for eight years. Early in her career, she used to send approach emails and query letters. Now, she does less of that, but gets lots of approach emails herself. Here’s what she’s learned about contacting someone you’ve never met before and asking them for help.

[Read the full article]

New Publisher Listing

firstwriter.com – Monday October 28, 2019

Publishes: Fiction;
Areas include: Erotic; Romance;
Markets: Adult;
Preferred styles: Contemporary

Digital-first adult fiction imprint. See website for details submission guidelines and to submit via online submission system.

[See the full listing]

When the pope offers writing advice, should you listen?

theguardian.com – Friday October 25, 2019

 

Pope Francis offered the staff of the Vatican some writing advice in September: “Give up using adjectives” – and also adverbs, as in phrases such as “authentically Christian”, to which he declared himself allergic. I suppose if there’s anyone you can’t condemn for pontificating like this, it’s the pontiff. Yet his advice annoyed me, as did some newly published tips aimed at scientists from the novelist Cormac McCarthy, who turns out to have been giving behind-the-scenes editorial advice to leading researchers for years. “Remove extra words or commas whenever you can,” reads McCarthy’s advice (as paraphrased by two of his academic collaborators). Also: “Don’t overelaborate.” Though he’s less of a stickler than Francis when it comes to adjectives: “Only use an adjective if it’s relevant.” In short, we’re back to William Strunk and EB White’s famous advice in The Elements Of Style: “Omit needless words.”

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