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Writers' News

Creative Writing Festival returns to Sunderland

sunderlandecho.com – Friday February 23, 2018

After the sell-out success of 2016, the festival is back throughout the month of March with a range of workshops and talks for writers of all abilities and at any stage of their writing journey.

Highlights include Writing Young Adult Fiction with Sally Green and Matthew Crow. Sally is the author of an internationally-acclaimed trilogy of young adult fantasy novels, the first of which, Half Bad, broke the Guinness World Record for Most Translated Book by a Debut Author, Pre-publication with 45 different translations before its publication.

[Read the full article]

IBPA Develops Standards for Hybrid Publishers

publishersweekly.com – Friday February 23, 2018

As hybrid publishing becomes a bigger part of the publishing business, the Independent Book Publishers Association (IBPA) has developed a nine-point list of criteria defining what it means to be a reputable hybrid publisher.

The goal of developing the guidelines is to "help hybrid publishers build better businesses based on clear and consistent best practices," said Maggie Langrick, CEO and publisher at LifeTree Media Ltd., and member of the IBPA advocacy committee.

[Read the full article]

Lindsay Literary Agency launches scholarship for under-represented children's writers

thebookseller.com – Tuesday February 20, 2018

The Lindsay Literary Agency is sponsoring a scholarship place for an "under-represented" writer of children's fiction at the Winchester Writers’ Festival 2018.

Open to unagented YA and middle grade writers, of any age, from an under-represented background (including but not limited to LGBTQIA, BAME and people with disabilities), the scholarship will cover the cost of three days at the festival which takes place 15th - 17th June. 

The scholarship includes access to all workshops and talks at the Winchester Writers’ Festival, four one-to-one appointments with industry experts, all meals, accommodation and travel. 

[Read the full article]

9 writing and reading tips from writers

artshub.co.uk – Monday February 19, 2018

Are you are an emerging or professional writer? Maybe your day job consist of writing, reading and replying to numerous emails. Perhaps you may want a better understanding of the craft of writing, which in turn will allow for a different perspective when you are reading other people’s words.

As Margret Atwood stated in The Guardian‘Reading and writing, like everything else, improve with practice. And, of course, if there are no young readers and writers, there will shortly be no older ones.'

To help you traverse this global culture of constant communication, ArtsHub spoke with five writers to ask them for some helpful reading advice.

[Read the full article]

Nourry: 'the e-book is a stupid product'

thebookseller.com – Monday February 19, 2018

Hachette Group c.e.o. Arnaud Nourry has expressed frustration with the e-book format, calling it a "stupid product" and forecasting its sales would continue to plateau because of a lack of innovation.

Nourry, who was speaking in an interview with Indian news site Scroll.in as part of the 10th anniversary celebrations for Hachette India, said he didn't think declines in e-book sales seen in the US and UK markets would reverse any time soon, because of the limitations of the format.

[Read the full article]

'Defend and nurture' UK publishing, Wise urges policymakers

thebookseller.com – Monday February 19, 2018

Curtis Brown agent Gordon Wise, former president of the Association of Authors' Agents, has urged parliamentarians to defend the achievements of UK publishers. 

Wise stood down as AAA president last month, making way for David Higham agent Lizzy Kremer. Reflecting on his time at the helm of the group, Wise was buoyant about the contributions of the publishing industry to the UK economy after its revenues totalled £4.8bn in 2016, according to the Publishers Association, with "significant growth" of exports in recent years.

[Read the full article]

New Magazine Listing

firstwriter.com – Monday February 19, 2018

Publishes: Essays; Fiction; Nonfiction; Poetry; 
Areas include: Arts; Biography; Criticism; 
Markets: Adult; 
Preferred styles: Literary

Open to work by New Zealand and Pacific writers or by writers whose work has a connection to the region in subject matter or location. Work from Australian writers is occasionally included as a special feature. Send up to 10 poems or up to three pieces of prose per issue. Preferred length is 3,000 words, but longer pieces will be considered.

[See the full listing]

John Grisham to appear with Lee Child at crime writing festival

home.bt.com – Sunday February 18, 2018

John Grisham will be a headline author at a UK crime writing festival where he will appear with writer Lee Child.

The author of The Firm, The Pelican Brief and A Time To Kill will be interviewed on stage at the Theakston Crime Writing Festival in Harrogate by Child, who is responsible for the Jack Reacher series.

Grisham will join previously announced special guest and Savages author Don Winslow.

[Read the full article]

Publisher’s story shows that pulp is not dead

bendbulletin.com – Sunday February 18, 2018

Print books are back. I think.

“People thought physical books were goners,” said Jed Lyons, chief executive of Lanham, Maryland-based Rowman & Littlefield Publishing Group.

He should know. Lyons, 66, ships about 41,000 books a day across the U.S. and to Europe. He has been in the publishing business since the 1970s.

[Read the full article]

What I Learned From Bestselling Author Andrew Neiderman

publishersweekly.com – Saturday February 17, 2018

I grew up in South Fallsburg, New York about 100 miles from New York City. I went to Fallsburg Central Schools, where it took nearly 10 villages and rural towns to create a district. And in my junior year of high school, I convinced the school leadership to allow me to graduate a year early, and I convinced my parents to let me escape small town life for college.

The main requirement for early graduation was doing double English in my junior year. So I signed up for the required New York State Regents English course, and took a creative writing elective. I was neither creative, nor showing any potential as a writer, but I was always a reader. And my creative writing teacher, Andrew Neiderman, nurtured that love of reading with the eclectic novels he chose for his syllabus, among them, Joseph Heller’s Catch-22 and Kurt Vonnegut’s Cat’s Cradle, books that have stayed with me nearly 50 years later.

[Read the full article]

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