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Writers' News

What Is J.K. Rowling's Net Worth?

thestreet.com – Monday June 10, 2019

Back when she first obtained a literary agent, J.K. Rowling was told she'd never be able to make money writing children's books. More than two decades later, she remains the wealthiest living writer.

J.K. Rowling has been famous since publication by Scholastic Corp.'s Arthur A. Levine Books imprint of "Harry Potter and the Sorcerer's Stone," her first book about the young Hogwarts School of Witchcraft and Wizardry student Harry Potter in 1998, with an initial print run of 50,000 copies. She has since published seven Harry Potter books, and according to Scholastic, more than 500 million copies of Harry Potter books have been sold worldwide.

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New Magazine Listing

firstwriter.com – Monday June 10, 2019

Publishes: Essays; Fiction; Nonfiction; Poetry; Reviews; 
Areas include: Criticism; 
Markets: Adult; 
Preferred styles: Literary

Online magazine publishing poetry, fiction, essays, reviews, criticisms, visual poems and multimedia projects. Send submissions by email.

[See the full listing]

How do authors earn a living? It’s a Catch-22 situation

ft.com – Friday June 7, 2019

As advances dwindle, TV adaptations and literary events are potential revenue streams

The excitement surrounding the new television series of Catch-22, starring and co-directed by George Clooney, is symptomatic of the current vogue for consuming literature via the small screen. Netflix recently announced that it had adapted around 50 literary works over the past year. Whereas once the only way of engaging with a book was to read it, now, in addition to watching TV or cinema adaptations, we are increasingly listening to the book in audio form — or to its author at an event or festival. The growing popularity of these modes of literary engagement is opening up new revenue streams for writers, just as earnings from the traditional model of advances and royalties are dwindling.

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Paradigm Taps Lit Agents Ryan Saul & Katt Riley

deadline.com – Friday June 7, 2019

Paradigm has hired Ryan Saul in their Motion Picture Literary department, and Katt Riley in their TV lit section. Both will be based out of the LA headquarters.
 
Saul’s clients include directors Wes Ball; his producing partner Joe Hartwick, Jr.; Oscar-nominated animation director Tim Reckart; Golden Globe-nominated director Klaus Haro; and award-winning commercial directors Henry Hudson and Gevorg Karensky.

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New Publisher Listing

firstwriter.com – Friday June 7, 2019

Publishes: Fiction; Poetry; 
Areas include: Autobiography; Short Stories; 
Markets: Adult; 
Preferred styles: Literary

Small literary press publishing full-length poetry collections, poetry chapbooks, literary fiction, essays, memoir, and hybrid forms, in both print and eBook editions. Currently looking for collections of poetry and hybrid poetry/prose, and collections of short fiction and lyric essays. Submit through online submission system. $20 submission fee.

[See the full listing]

Kate Shaw to launch new literary agency

thebookseller.com – Thursday June 6, 2019

Kate Shaw is leaving The Viney Shaw Agency to set up her own literary agency next month. 

The Shaw Agency will be launched on 1st July and Shaw will take her existing client list which includes novelists Isabel Ashdown, Lesley Lokko and Susan Elliot Wright, journalists Ian Cobain and Alex Crawford and children’s novelists Fleur Hitchcock, Vashti Hardy, Alan MacDonald, James Nicol and Holly Smale with her. 

An agent since 2001, Shaw worked at Aitken Alexander Associates before joining The Viney Agency in 2009. She became director in 2017 and the firm was renamed The Viney Shaw Agency.

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New Magazine Listing

firstwriter.com – Thursday June 6, 2019

Publishes: Fiction; Poetry; 
Areas include: Short Stories; Women's Interests; 
Markets: Adult; 
Preferred styles: Literary

Online magazine publishing feminist prose and poetry. Send up to five poems or up to 2,000 words of prose by email. See website for full guidelines.

[See the full listing]

New Publisher Listing

firstwriter.com – Wednesday June 5, 2019

Publishes: Fiction; 
Areas include: Erotic; Fantasy; Romance; Sci-Fi; Short Stories; 
Markets: Adult; Children's; Youth

Publishes comics, manuscripts, graphic novels, and anthologies. See website for submission guidelines and current calls.

[See the full listing]

New Publisher Listing

firstwriter.com – Monday June 3, 2019

Publishes: Fiction; Poetry; 
Markets: Adult; 
Preferred styles: Literary

Publishes novellas of literary fiction, and poetry. Accepts work from Canadian citizens residing in Canada only. Novellas should be between 20,000 and 40,000 words. No genre fiction. Not accepting poetry manuscripts as at June 2019. No electronic submissions.

[See the full listing]

So you want to be a novelist? A New York literary agent, editor and author reveal how bestsellers are born

independent.co.uk – Sunday June 2, 2019

Stephen Barbara’s office is nothing to be afraid of. It’s a small, cosy space in Midtown Manhattan with a bookshelf in the corner and inspirational messages on the walls (“There is nothing new in art except talent” and “A mind needs books as a sword needs a whetstone if it is to keep its edge”). Barbara himself is a welcoming person. Though he does claim to be “very argumentative”, that side of his personality doesn’t manifest itself during our hour-long chat. He’s polite, voluble, and answers questions with the patience and precision of someone who loves the topic at hand. Yet most strangers who attempt to contact Barbara will agonise over their emails for weeks. They will ask their friends to proof-read their messages. They will hold their breath as they hit send. They will spend the next hours, days or weeks anxiously refreshing their email inbox. In other words, they will manage their communications with a level of anguish that seems irreconcilable with the perfectly pleasant person sitting in front of me. Stephen Barbara, you see, is a New York literary agent.

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