Traditional Publishing
Self-Publishing
Share

Writers' News

New Magazine Listing

firstwriter.com – Thursday May 23, 2019

Publishes: Fiction; Nonfiction; Poetry; Scripts; 
Areas include: Drama; Short Stories; 
Markets: Adult; 
Preferred styles: Literary

Literary journal publishing work by undergraduates around the world. Publishes fiction between 10 and 15 double spaced pages; creative nonfiction between 7 and 10 double spaced pages; comics of high literary quality; screenwriting; and both free verse and formal poetry (submit 3-5 poems). Submit through online submission system via website.

[See the full listing]

Portico Prize relaunches with Manchester Writing School

thebookseller.com – Tuesday May 21, 2019

The £10,000 Portico Prize will return after a four-year absence with a new partnership with the Manchester Writing School at Manchester Metropolitan University.

Blogger and broadcaster Simon Savidge will chair the panel for the 2019 prize with fellow judges including actor Holliday Grainger, who starred in the BBC adaptation of J K Rowling’s Cormoran Strike novels, as well as writer and performer Kate Fox, novelist Zahid Hussain and Jean Sprackland, professor of creative writing at Manchester Metropolitan University.

[Read the full article]

New Publisher Listing

firstwriter.com – Tuesday May 21, 2019

Publishes: Fiction; Nonfiction; 
Areas include: Autobiography; Biography; Cookery; Crafts; Gardening; Nature; Self-Help; 
Markets: Adult; Children's

Publishes nonfiction and children's fiction, including picture books, picture storybooks, easy readers, early chapter books, and middle grade novels. Accepts submissions from US authors only. Send query by email. See website for full guidelines.

[See the full listing]

Publishing: How To Get Your Writing Picked Up

mainepublic.org – Saturday May 18, 2019

Our panel examines the ins and outs of the publishing industry, including: honing writing skills, finding an agent, getting published, and the business of bookselling. We’ll also hear about how bookstores determine which books to feature, and why.

[Read the full article]

Harlequin Presents/ M&B Modern Blitz

firstwriter.com – Saturday May 18, 2019

Harlequin Presents/ M&B Modern are looking for new authors. You can submit your first chapter between Wednesday 15th May and Sunday 2nd June 2019, and get a response by Friday 14th June 2019.

What you need to know:

[Read the full article]

Your Complete Guide to Popular Literary Devices in Great Writing

bookriot.com – Thursday May 16, 2019

We all know what it means to read “good writing,” right?  Well, no, we don’t. It’s true that we often recognize something as “great” when we see it. Our teachers may reference the “literary devices” that make it good. But if you have to talk about a book in a class, it can be hard to describe “greatness.” This is even more nerve-wracking on a test or quiz. I can’t just write “I liked it” and move on!

WHAT ARE LITERARY DEVICES?

One of the best ways to connect deeply with texts when you are just learning about how to define good writing is through literary devices. Literary devices are like strategies or techniques that a writer can use. They showcase creative thought and connections between things that might otherwise not be connected. When we notice a great connection being made, we get the opportunity to share it with others in our classes or among our friends who also are reading such a book.

Below are just a few of the literary devices you may encounter as you delve into the great works of literature. You might also notice variations of them in your reading for pleasure, and thinking about literary devices may allow you to marvel even more at the genius of your favorite authors.

[Read the full article]

Rankin and Cleeves to headline Bute Noir crime writing festival

thebookseller.com – Thursday May 16, 2019

Ian Rankin and Ann Cleeves will headline this summer's Bute Noir crime writing festival. 

Authors Mark Billingham, Denise Mina, Stuart MacBride, Chris Brookmyre, Ruth Ware and Mick Herron will also join the line-up for the festival in Rothesay, which takes place from Friday 2nd August 2 to Sunday 4th August. 

Organisers have also signed up authors Oscar de Muriel from Mexico, Lilja Sigurdardottir from Iceland, Thomas Enger from Norway, Alexandra Sokoloff from the USA, and Liz Nugent from Ireland as well as leading Scottish talent including Alex Gray, Lin Anderson and Craig Robertson.

[Read the full article]

Writers blocked: Even fantasy fiction is now offensive

spectator.co.uk – Thursday May 16, 2019

It was Lionel Shriver who saw the writing on the wall. Giving a keynote speech at the Brisbane Writers Festival three years ago in which she decried the scourge of modern identity politics, Shriver observed that the dogma of ‘cultural appropriation’ —which demands no less than complete racial segregation in the arts — had not yet wrapped its osseous fingers around the publishing industry. But, she warned: ‘This same sensibility is coming to a bookstore near you.’ Reader, it has come.

[Read the full article]

Jeffery Deaver interview: The secrets of writing a bestseller

cambridgeindependent.co.uk – Wednesday May 15, 2019

Thriller writer Jeffery Deaver was penning award nominated novels - but for some reason they weren’t selling.

After his sixth book - a mystery in the Poirot vein - came out to critical acclaim, but little money, he knew he had to act.

“They were well received, but they didn't do extremely well in terms of sales. Then I re-read them and I realized they weren’t as good as I had hoped,” says Jeffery.

That’s when he began working on something he calls his ‘mint toothpaste’ business plan.

“I’m a big list maker and I was aware that I needed to be more scientific about it. So it was in my late 30s I outlined a book for the first time - after writing half a dozen. That book was exponentially better and so I have been following that model ever since.”

[Read the full article]

How to write a novel – four fiction writers on Danielle Steel’s insane working day

– Wednesday May 15, 2019

She might be the world’s most famous romance writer, nay the highest selling living author bar none, but there’s little room for flowers and chocolates in Danielle Steel’s writing regime. In a recent interview she laughed at the idea of young people insisting on a work-life balance, and has claimed she regularly writes for 20 to 22 hours a day, and sometimes 24. The result: 179 books in under 50 years, selling about 800m copies.

Some aspiring novelists might just have cancelled their entire lives to get on the Steel plan, but many more are probably wondering if it’s time to try something less demanding. We asked four creative writing teachers for their perspective:

[Read the full article]

Page of 206 50
Share