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Writers' News

Traditionally Published Authors Want What Indies Have

goodereader.com – Friday March 9, 2018

When self-published authors like Amanda Hocking became book industry names, it was for reaching incredible sales figures on the fairly new Kindle e-reading platform. After reaching newsworthy levels of success, Hocking and others like her attracted the attention of literary agents and publishers looking to reach consumers. Experts would often question why an author who was already on the bestseller list would possibly be convinced to give a sizeable portion of their royalties; the answer was almost always the same: “I’m tired of being a businessman, I want to go back to being a writer.”

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From romance to rhetoric and from sonnets to satire: the Canterbury festival poet of the year competition 2018 is launched

firstwriter.com – Friday March 9, 2018

The Canterbury Festival Poet of the Year Competition 2018 is now open for entries.

This is the 12th year of the Competition which has grown into an internationally respected event and forms a major part of the Festival year. In 2016 there were a total of 391 entries from all over the world and in 2017 there were 311 poems submitted.  

Each year around 35 poems are longlisted from the entries received and these are published in an anthology; copies are available from the Festival Office for £5 each. Poets included in the booklet receive a free copy. 

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This Podcast-Based Writing Course Will Get You Working on Your Dream Novel

lifehacker.com – Thursday March 8, 2018

Tim Clare’s Couch to 80K writing podcast is a delightful, intense, encouraging eight-week journey towards writing a novel. For the best experience, go into it blind; all you need to know is that it’s good and it’s appropriate for any experience level. If you want to know more, keep reading, but be aware that here be spoilers.

Okay, just us? I won’t give away the specific writing exercises, but I’ll provide a rough map of where the course will take you. It’s an adventure! At first I thought I’d listen to a few episodes to see if it was worth recommending. Instead, it drew me in and I completed the whole course. Ever since I finished, I miss hearing Tim Clare’s encouraging and slightly angry voice every day. But that pleasure can now be yours.

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Teaching William Zinsser to Write Poetry

newyorker.com – Tuesday March 6, 2018

In the spring of 2012, I got a call from William Zinsser, asking if I thought I could teach him to write poetry. “Yes,” I replied, confident not so much in myself as in him: if Zinsser, the beloved nonfiction guru, the author of “On Writing Well” and eighteen other books, couldn’t be taught to write poetry, nobody could. There was just one catch: Bill was blind.

He wasn’t completely blind, not yet; he could still make out shapes and shadows. Progressive glaucoma had recently caused him to retire from writing prose, a practice he’d maintained, weekdays from nine to five, into his eighty-ninth year, working in a one-room office on East Fifty-fifth Street. Bill’s daily commute to that office—a half-mile walk—had become too harrowing.

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Philip Pullman calls for authors to get fairer share of publisher profits

theguardian.com – Monday March 5, 2018

Philip Pullman has called on publishers to stop damaging “the ecology of the book world” and start giving authors a fairer share of the money their books earn.

Speaking in his capacity as president of the Society of Authors, the His Dark Materials author hit out at the fact that while profit margins in publishing are rising, the money authors are paid is going down.

“To allow corporate profits to be so high at a time when author earnings are markedly falling is, apart from anything else, shockingly bad husbandry. It’s perfectly possible to make a good profit and pay a fair return to all of those on whose work, after all, everything else depends. But that’s not happening at the moment,” said Pullman. “I like every individual editor, designer, marketing and publicity person I deal with; but I don’t like what publishers, corporately, are doing to the ecology of the book world. It’s damaging, and it should change.”

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Owlkids Books named finalist for Bologna Prize for the Best Children’s Publishers of the Year

quillandquire.com – Sunday March 4, 2018

Toronto’s Owlkids Books has been shortlisted for this year’s Bologna Prize for the Best Children’s Publishers of the Year. The awards are given to publishers representing six international regions, as selected by publishing houses, associations, and other books institutions.

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Writers, editors offer pet peeves to mark National Grammar Day

prdaily.com – Sunday March 4, 2018

Editors wish people would think about their grammar every day—and those professional nitpickers are using an upcoming holiday to sound off about what drives them nuts.

March 4 is National Grammar Day, and to mark the occasion, we at PR Daily solicited writers’ and editors’ biggest gripes when it comes to linguistic lapses.

Whether it’s in the form of improper punctuation, misapplied homonyms or a lack of care when speaking off the cuff, word nerds can all agree: Bad grammar is like nails on a chalkboard.

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Annick Press named finalist for Bologna Prize for the Best Children’s Publishers of the Year

quillandquire.com – Friday March 2, 2018

Toronto’s Annick Press has been shortlisted for this year’s Bologna Prize for the Best Children’s Publishers of the Year. The awards are given to publishers representing six international regions, as selected by publishing houses, associations, and other books institutions. This is Annick’s second nomination since the inaugural awards in 2013.

Also nominated for this award in the North America category are Toronto’s Owlkids Books and Editions D’eux from Sherbrooke, Quebec.

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SoA challenges publishers to reveal how much they pay authors

thebookseller.com – Friday March 2, 2018

The chief executive of the Society of Authors has challenged publishers to reveal how much they pay writers in their annual financial accounts.

Publishers' profits have grown while authors' pay has shrunk in recent years, Nicola Solomon has argued in an articlefor The Bookseller. As a result, the chief of the trade body is calling on publishers to state in their financial accounts how much they pay authors, illustrators and translators in advances, royalties and secondary income.

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Should you enter a writing contest?

seattletimes.com – Thursday March 1, 2018

Yes, yes, yes you should.  Writing contests offer many benefits, not the least of which is a deadline. There’s nothing like a deadline to force you to put your posterior in a chair and some words down on paper. You can also win prize money, get published, establish credibility, build your writer’s platform and grow a readership.  The first step is to enter.  It can be daunting, but to grow as a writer, you need to send your work out into the world. Contests offer that opportunity.

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