Traditional Publishing
Self-Publishing
Share

Writers' News

Write on: How you can publish a best-seller - The ebook revolution allows new authors to find fame

thisismoney.co.uk – Sunday January 17, 2016

They say everyone has at least one good book in them – and thanks to the internet there is no longer an excuse not to get it published. 

The ebook revolution means writers no longer face the hassle of having to find publishers or agents who are willing to take them on.

Although sales of print books have enjoyed a resurgence in recent years, ebooks – that can be downloaded and read on handheld electronic devices – are predicted to outsell traditional books by 2018.

[Read the full article]

Thinking Of Publishing A Book? Here Are Three Things You Need To Know

forbes.com – Sunday January 17, 2016

I do quite a bit of writing, and every so often the idea of publishing a book crosses my mind. Normally, thoughts like “I should write a book!” fall into the same category as “we should start a band,” or “let’s buy a bar!” Still, sometimes my interest gets the best of me, and I do a bit of digging into what it would take to get published.

Fortunately, I have a trusted resource close to home. My business partner’s wife, Maury Ankrum, recently went through the process of writing a book and getting published, and she was more than willing to share a few things she’s learned throughout her journey.

[Read the full article]

Submit for the next issue of Phenomenal Literature

firstwriter.com – Sunday January 17, 2016

The new issue of Verbal Art has been released and you can find its details on its website: www.verbalart.in. Now the editors are looking for material for the next issue of Phenomenal Literature. The submission guidelines can be found at http://phenomenalliterature.com/submission.php. The last date for submission is 31 January 2016 and the next issue will come out by 31 March 2016.

[Read the full article]

Self-Publishing Preview: 2016

publishersweekly.com – Saturday January 16, 2016

In 2015, self-publishing saw a number of high-profile success stories. Jamie McGuire’s Beautiful Redemption became the first novel by an indie author to find shelf space at Walmart, and Andy Weir’s The Martian, originally self-published, was released as a major motion picture starring Matt Damon. Paul Kingsnorth’s The Wake received major traditional media coverage and was reviewed in the New York Times (albeit after it was longlisted for the Man Booker Prize in 2014 and picked up by Graywolf Press), and such writers as Vi Keeland, Penelope Ward, Deborah Bladon, and Tijan saw their indie books reach the New York Times digital bestseller list. Crowdfunding also continued to be a popular platform, with dozens of publishing projects successfully funded on Kickstarter, covering everything from teaching programming to kids to a Lil Bub picture book.

[Read the full article]

Fiction and poetry submissions invited for new issue of magazine

firstwriter.com – Thursday January 14, 2016

firstwriter.com has just announced the launch of the latest issue of its long-running literary journal, firstwriter.magazine.

firstwriter.magazine has been published twice a year since 2002, making it probably one of the longest-running online journals on the internet. This 28th issue features the usual mix of quality fiction and poetry from around the world, plus the first chance to see not just the winning story from the Eleventh International Short Story Contest, but also all ten Special Commendations. You can view the magazine by clicking here. If you'd like to enter your work in the Twelfth International Short Story Contestclick here.

[Read the full article]

Writing a bestseller ‘on the verge of a stroke’

spectator.co.uk – Thursday January 14, 2016

Every four seconds, somewhere in the world, a Lee Child book is sold. This phenomenal statistic places Child alongside Stephen King, James Patterson and J.K. Rowling as one of the world’s bestselling novelists. But what makes the Jack Reacher books so successful? This is one of the questions Andy Martin, a lecturer in French and Philosophy at Cambridge, sets out to answer in this intriguing and uniquely unclassifiable book. Reacher Said Nothing, however, isn’t a work of literary criticism or a how-to guide. Martin contacted Child and asked whether he could observe the entire writing process for the 20th Reacher novel, Make Me. Amazingly, Child said yes.

[Read the full article]

Norwich to become literary capital with a National Centre for Writing

itv.com – Wednesday January 13, 2016

Novelists, including recently published, Benjamin Johncock have welcomed the news that Norwich is to open a National Centre for Writers in the city's Dragon Hall.

Norwich has long provided literary inspiration for writers such as Rose Tremain, Kazuo Ishiguro, Ian McEwan, Anna Sewell and Tracy Chevalier. And the University of East Anglia's Creative Writing MA course has an alumni of dozens of award-winning authors.

[Read the full article]

National Centre for Writing project in Norwich granted £900,000

theguardian.com – Friday January 8, 2016

Backed by major writers including JM Coetzee, Margaret Atwood and Anthony Horowitz, plans to open the National Centre for Writing, in Norwich – a first in the UK – have moved closer to fruition after the project was awarded a grant of almost £1m. The project is being organised by the Writers’ Centre Norwich, a literature development agency.

[Read the full article]

Philip Pullman: professional writers set to become 'an endangered species'

theguardian.com – Thursday January 7, 2016

His Dark Materials author Philip Pullman is heading a new charge from writers demanding to be rewarded fairly for their work, as the Society of Authors warns that unless “serious” changes are made by publishers, the professional author “will become an endangered species”.

[Read the full article]

Michael Hamilburg, Hollywood Literary Agent, Dies at 82

hollywoodreporter.com – Thursday January 7, 2016

Michael Hamilburg, a veteran literary agent and producer, died Jan. 1 of complications from Parkinson’s disease at his home in Los Angeles, his wife, Susan, said. He was 82.

His father founded the Mitchell J. Hamilburg Agency with clients that including Gene Autry, Deanna Durbin and Bob Keeshan (Captain Kangaroo).

[Read the full article]

Page of 153 120
Share