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Writer seeks Kindled spirit: Six novelists reveal how to self-publish successfully

dailymail.co.uk – Sunday April 16, 2017

The dawn of the digital era means that authors can self-publish their books – and make a fortune. Laura Silverman asks six independent novelists to reveal the secrets of clicking with your readership.

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The Devil’s Door: A call for contributions

dark-mountain.net – Thursday April 13, 2017

Each year, we publish two books: a spring anthology which follows in the line of our early issues, and an autumn special issue, whose editors get to play with other ways of making a Dark Mountain book, while pushing deeper into a theme on which this project touches. We started doing this two years ago with Techne, followed by last October’s Uncivilised Poetics. This year, we are planning a special issue on the theme of ‘the sacred’. Today, as we announce our call for contributions, Dark Mountain co-founder Dougald Hine explains why we chose this theme, what we understand by it, and the different approach we are taking to the submissions process this time around.

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Kameron Hurley: How to Write a Book in a Month

locusmag.com – Monday April 10, 2017

We all want to learn how to write books faster. The pace of the news cycle today has heated up to such an extent that for those of us who aren’t in the 1% of writers, if we don’t come out with a book a year, it feels like the world has forgotten us amid the buzz of ever more intensifying world horror. I’m not immune to this pressure. Juggling a day job, a book a year (writing), a book a year (promot­ing), and completing various freelance articles like this one takes its toll. Stuff goes out late. It’s pushed out. It squeezes in just under the wire (like this column). At some point when you’re on the writing treadmill, it feels like you’ve gotten so behind that you’ll never catch up again.

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Is Book Publishing Too Liberal?

publishersweekly.com – Saturday April 8, 2017

When Simon & Schuster announced in late February that it is canceling Milo Yiannopoulos’s book, Dangerous, many in the publishing industry reacted with a sigh of relief. The six-figure book deal that the right-wing provocateur landed at Threshold Editions, S&S’s conservative imprint, late last year caused a wave of criticism—from various factions of the media, the public, and the house’s own authors. And, though it’s still unclear what ultimately motivated the publisher to yank the book, the fervor that the alt-right bad boy’s deal caused put some on alert. Could other publishers be pressured into canceling books by controversial conservatives? Does the industry have a double standard for authors on the right? Does it matter?

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New Magazine Listing

firstwriter.com – Friday April 7, 2017

Publishes: Fiction; Nonfiction; Poetry; 
Areas include: Short Stories; 
Markets: Adult; 
Preferred styles: Literary

Publishes poetry, fiction, and creative nonfiction. Submit 1-3 poems (up to 7 pages max); or one short story or novel excerpt, or piece of creative nonfiction (up to 20 pages or 6,000 words). Submit via website using online submission system ($2 charge for non-subscribers). Accepts submissions between September 1 and December 1, and between March 1 and June 1, annually.

[See the full listing]

‘Just five more minutes …’: the joy of writing for children

irishtimes.com – Thursday April 6, 2017

There’s something magical about writing for 9-12-year-olds. I have loved books all my life, but it was at this age that I remember most clearly the overwhelming compulsion to keep reading, to find out what happens next, just one more chapter, just five more minutes. It’s the age when you first discover the joys of reading by torchlight under your duvet, the rest of the house quiet, hoping you won’t be caught before your hero escapes from the bad guys.

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Considering Getting a Literary Agent? Why You May or May Not Need One

snhu.edu – Thursday April 6, 2017

As a writer, the road to publication can be fraught with a mix of unexpected opportunities and challenges. Like anything else, though, the more you know about what could happen, the better prepared you'll be to overcome setbacks and move forward to success.

A Novelist's Story

Novelist Derrick Craigie, also the associate dean of faculty for creative writing and literature online at Southern New Hampshire University, shares his experience and offers insights into the world of publication for fiction writers.

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New Publisher Listing

firstwriter.com – Wednesday April 5, 2017

Publishes: Fiction; Nonfiction; 
Areas include: Biography; Fantasy; Historical; Military; Sci-Fi; TV; 
Markets: Adult; Children's; Youth

Award-winning independent book publisher, publishing a wide variety of books, from nonfiction, general fiction and children's, through to a range of cult TV books. Submit by post or using online submission form. No children's picture books. See website for full guidelines.

[See the full listing]

Writing in the time of great editors

mysanantonio.com – Tuesday April 4, 2017

Editors are the invisible hands that guide publishers and help writers strengthen their craft to achieve greatness. When thinking of greatness, I am reminded of Malvolio’s soliloquy in Shakespeare’s “Twelfth Night when he says: “Some are born great, some achieve greatness, and some have greatness thrust upon ’em.”

Scrivener & Sons’ editor Maxwell Perkins was one of those born great. He edited Ernest Hemingway’s liberal use of salty language and fear of semicolons, resolved F. Scott Fitzgerald’s hesitation for book titles (Perkins replaced “Trimalchio in West Egg” with “The Great Gatsby”) and hacked off Thomas Wolfe’s purple prose and redundancy.

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What Is Camp NaNoWriMo? 7 Tips For A Successful Writing Month

bustle.com – Sunday April 2, 2017

At some point, all budding writers have fantasized about leaving their hectic lives behind and heading off to a cabin in the woods for some uninterrupted writing time. Sadly, most of us are a little too busy to do that — but the upcoming Camp NaNoWriMo in April might be the second best thing. Camp NaNoWriMo describes itself on its website as "an idyllic writer's retreat, smack-dab in the middle of your crazy life" — and can you think of anything more perfect than that?

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