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New Publisher Listing

firstwriter.com – Thursday August 16, 2018

Publishes: Nonfiction; Poetry; 
Areas include: Autobiography; 
Markets: Adult

Publishes poetry, memoirs, essays, and books on the craft of writing. Runs two poetry prizes.

[See the full listing]

Why Authors Are Earning Less Even As Book Sales Rise

forbes.com – Sunday August 12, 2018

HarperCollins reported $490 million in sales for the last quarter on Thursday, up $83 million from the same quarter in 2017, partially due to rising digital audiobook and ebook sales. It's just the latest confirmation that traditional book publishers are doing well for themselves: The Publishers Association recently found the UK publishing industry's £5.7 billion in book sales income to be up 5% over the year prior.

That's in contrast to a June 2018 report out from the Authors’ Licensing and Collecting Society that holds author earnings have dipped by 42% over the last ten years, and that median annual income for professional authors is now below £10,500. How can author earnings slip so far even as book publishers' incomes continue to rise? There's no simple answer, but plenty of factors contribute to the seeming disparity.

[Read the full article]

New Magazine Listing

firstwriter.com – Thursday August 9, 2018

Publishes: Fiction; Nonfiction; Poetry; 
Areas include: Short Stories; 
Markets: Adult

Publishes unpublished short fiction, poetry, prose poems, creative nonfiction, and artwork. Accepts submissions year-round and supports emerging writers and artists. Electronic submissions only.

[See the full listing]

New Literary Agency Listing

firstwriter.com – Thursday August 9, 2018

Handles: Fiction
Markets: Children's; Youth

Handles fiction for children, from chapter books for emerging readers up to young adult / crossover titles. No picture books. Send query by email with one-page synopsis and full ms. No postal submissions.

[See the full listing]

Ebooks: How digital publishers are 'shaking up' the industry

bbc.com – Wednesday August 8, 2018

JK Rowling notoriously received numerous rejections before meeting her literary agent, and later, publisher. Having stacked up at least 60 rejections in my writing career, I know exactly how that feels.

And while being a novelist recently came out on top in a survey as one of the most desirable jobs to have, it is definitely not for the faint hearted.

I now have an agent and an award, but it wasn't always that way.

As a writer, the first step to securing a publishing deal is to acquire an agent, a middle-man, basically your number one fan who will shout about how good you are to publishers and hopefully persuade them to read your carefully-crafted novel.

They are the gatekeepers to the publishing industry.

Digital publishers, however, are changing the game because they talk directly to authors.

[Read the full article]

ICM Promotes Three to Agents

variety.com – Tuesday August 7, 2018

Talent agency ICM Partners has promoted three to agents.

ICM upped Celestine Au and Madeline Feder to agents in the talent department, and Viviane Telio to agent in the motion picture literary department.

Au started at ICM in 2015, spending two years as a talent department assistant before being promoted to talent department coordinator last year. Au was recognized as one of Variety’s 10 Assistants to Watch in 2017 and is part of Time’s Up Next Gen. She was born in Hong Kong and raised in Shanghai before moving to the U.S. to attend UCLA, where she completed 12 internships and graduated with a degree in communication studies. She is fluent in Mandarin and has traveled to China with ICM agents, acting as an interpreter, and helping the team close deals and sign clients.

[Read the full article]

The one piece of advice every aspiring author needs to know

independent.co.uk – Sunday August 5, 2018

If you are one of the millions of people who aspire to be a published author, I have some writing advice for you: never listen to writing advice.

Not that it’s easy to avoid. If you go on Twitter and follow the hashtag #amwriting you’ll get more unsolicited advice than you know what to do with. Do this, do that, don’t on any account do the other. Everyone it seems, has some rules for you to follow.

Which is hardly surprising, as literally almost everybody is writinga book. And I use the phrase “literally almost everybody” advisedly. At the BookExpo America conference in 2015, author Jane McGonigal claimed that 90 per cent of young people in the US say they want to write a book.

[Read the full article]

New Publisher Listing

firstwriter.com – Friday August 3, 2018

Publishes: Fiction; Nonfiction; 
Markets: Adult; Youth

Describes itself as a conventional independent publishing house that thinks unconventionally. Willing to consider most genres of fiction and nonfiction, other than hate books and gratuitous pornography. Approach using submission form on website.

[See the full listing]

Agent Danielle Smith’s Former Clients Speak Out

publishersweekly.com – Thursday August 2, 2018

The children’s book publishing world has been roiling for the past week over the disclosure that Danielle Smith, the principal of Lupine Grove Creative, an agency specializing in children’s and YA authors, acted more like a literary grifter than a literary agent. Since Smith emailed a letter to her clients on July 24, confessing that recently she had “not handled a situation as well as I should have” and thus was dissolving the agency effective immediately, 19 former clients have reached out to PW, sharing tales of a pattern of malfeasance that has shaken their confidence and adversely affected their careers.

According to some former clients, she claimed to have had offers in hand that didn’t exist, such as, one author requesting anonymity disclosed, a $50,000 two-book deal. She informed others that editors had expressed interest in their submissions, but subsequently told them that either the editors had then lost interest or had outright rejected those submissions. Clients also complained about Smith’s refusal to communicate with them honestly and in a timely fashion, as well as the lack of transparency, including a reluctance to render submission lists to them upon request. A few clients allege that she even forged emails from editors and passed this correspondence along to them.

[Read the full article]

How to Write a Book Without Losing Your Mind

theatlantic.com – Thursday August 2, 2018

A few months ago, I promised some nice people in New York that I would, sometime very soon, write a book.

Since then, I have:

Called my mom rejoicing.

Called my mom crying.

Considered changing my Twitter bio, then thought better of it.

Considered emailing all my ex-boyfriends and mentors to let them know I’m an impostor, then thought better of it.

Extensively researched three different long-form writing softwares, only to find that I prefer the first one I ever tried.

[Read the full article]

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