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Writing a series? Here’s a series of things to think about

irishtimes.com – Thursday June 2, 2016

The concept of serialised fiction is not a recent one. A significant number of nineteenth-century novelists (Charles Dickens and Alexandre Dumas among them) were published for the first time in serial form, some even reacting to readers’ responses while they continued to write.

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How to Start a Blog: The Only Guide You’ll Ever Need

onblastblog.com – Thursday June 2, 2016

I think you’ll agree with me when I say:

Everyone wants to feel and achieve success and happiness in their lives.

You’re here because you’re considering starting a blog.

Forget what you’ve heard about making a blog. Creating your own is very simple and rather quick when you know what you’re doing.

This step-by-step guide below will show you EXACTLY how to get started, so that you can have your blog up and running within minutes.

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Why Do Magazines and Book Publishers Rip Off Ideas? (Because They Can.)

huffingtonpost.com – Wednesday June 1, 2016

There’s nothing new under the sun. This old saw is one of the first things you learn on the job if you’re a writer, artist, or other drudge who tries to earn a living making things up.

I can still remember my astonishment when, a few years after my first book for kids was published by Henry Holt in 1994, an almost ridiculously similar children’s title (though in pop-up form) came out from Little Simon.

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Top writing tips

theguardian.com – Wednesday June 1, 2016

From that killer first line to dealing with writer’s block, author Chris D’Lacey shares his top writing tips.

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Six Things All Self-Publishers Should Know

huffingtonpost.com – Sunday May 29, 2016

Last year I self-published my first real book - by this I mean a book that I physically launched and is in bookshops and everything. A book I have promoted and sunk time and money into; a book that I’ll be spending the next 18 months focusing on continuing to push out into the world.

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How to Turn Your ‘Off’ Writing Days Into ‘On’ Days

huffingtonpost.com – Saturday May 28, 2016

When it comes to the discipline of writing, there’s a lot of talk about showing up. Butt in chair. Schedule the time. Keep your dates with yourself. All of this is good advice, and the most successful and prolific authors have the disposition or the drive or the self-governance required to stay the course on the long and arduous journey of writing a book, or multiple books.

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Harry Potter and the Minotaur’s Rage: how fanfiction got me into writing

newstatesman.com – Wednesday May 25, 2016

My fanfiction was almost uniformly awful, like most of the things I did or liked when I was becoming myself.

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Writing a book with your dad is hard. It's harder if your dad is Thomas Keneally

theguardian.com – Monday May 23, 2016

There’s a thick and slightly battered volume on my bookshelf, with a line drawing of a man in a deerstalker hat. The book, The Complete Sherlock Holmes, has an inscription on the cover page. It reads: “To Meg, who has made and will make great fantasies of her own. Love, your father.” The date he has written is that of my 12th birthday.

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The new digital model that treats books like magazines

thebookseller.com – Saturday May 21, 2016

The digital revolution has been something of an asteroid for the whole publishing industry, but it has presented particularly gnarly challenges to libraries, colleges and schools. 

How to transfer collections from the stacks to the screen? How does digital lending work, both practically and financially? Which texts would publishers be willing to digitise, and which would languish in analogue ignominy on the shelves?

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What's Next for Hybrid Publishing

publishersweekly.com – Saturday May 21, 2016

In 2012, I cofounded She Writes Press with a clear vision for what our press would be, but without a clear definition. We were creating something that combined self-publishing and traditional publishing, curating the books, and placing a strong value on editing and design, but without author platforms or a particular sales threshold driving our publishing decisions. Because our model is author subsidized, we were decidedly not traditional publishing, but we were not self-publishing either.

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