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Where Have All the Midsize Book Publishers Gone?

publishersweekly.com – Sunday October 3, 2021

When Hachette Book Group acquired Workman Publishing, HBG CEO Michael Pietsch observed that Workman was one of the biggest, if not the biggest, remaining independent trade publishers left in the U.S. Based on available data, a case could indeed be made that Workman was the largest of its kind. Which has raised a question in publishing circles: why are there so few independent publishers of size? There is a dearth of what can be called midsize publishers that fall between the Big Five and the many independent publishers with sales of $20 million or less.

The Houghton Mifflin Harcourt trade division, with 2020 sales of $192 million, was what could have been considered a mini-major before it was acquired by HarperCollins. The Scholastic trade group, with sales of $355 million in the fiscal year ended May 31, is a major player in the children’s trade market, but as part of a $1.3 billion publisher, it is clearly not independent. Other trade publishers that could be considered midsize that are also part of larger companies are Disney’s publishing division and Abrams, which is owned by the French company La Martinière Groupe, which was itself acquired by Media Participations.

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Byrd Leavell Discusses Key Strategies for Finding the Right Literary Agent

digitaljournal.com – Tuesday September 28, 2021

With more than fifteen years in the publishing sphere, seasoned agent and head of publishing at United Talent Agency Byrd Leavell is keenly aware of what it takes to find the right literary agent for your next book.

An agent’s growing list of submissions means they’re facing a mounting workload on a strict deadline. If you want an agent to consider your book, grabbing their attention immediately is an absolute must. Within the first polished 50 to 100 pages, define and demonstrate a compelling development in your plot that is centered around the inciting incident.

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Ten Things Nobody Tells You About the Publishing Industry

publishersweekly.com – Sunday September 26, 2021

There’s more to authoring than conquering the blank page. Dozens of unique quirks of industry factor into the experience of a creative. If you’re an aspiring writer with traditional publishing in mind, pay attention. Here’s what to expect from author life:

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What makes a good writer? Human stories, active voice and an open mind

journalism.co.uk – Thursday September 16, 2021

Many journalists find their way to the industry because of their love of writing. We put together words and sentences to tell stories that matter, always with one eye on the word count and deadlines. Most of the time, we enjoy the process of writing as much as seeing the final piece of work getting published.

But what is good writing? Is it the ability of a perspicacious reporter to punctiliously select supreme words, refining his or her locution to the point of perfection? Or is it the skill of telling a story clearly, concisely and accurately?

You know the answer. But sometimes journalists’ passion for the written word can be their worst enemy and we end up stuffing our stories with fluff and gibberish.

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How to Make a Zine: A Guide to Self-Publishing Your Own Miniature Magazine

mymodernmet.com – Wednesday September 8, 2021

Even if you’ve never heard of a zine, chances are you’ve probably had one in your hands at some point without even knowing. These handmade booklets provide a way for people to share their art, writing, musings, and give a platform to underrepresented and marginalized voices. If you’ve got something to say, why not use a zine to express yourself? Read on to learn about the history of the zine, and how you can make one yourself.

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How Lindsey Duga became successful young adult novelist

225batonrouge.com – Sunday September 5, 2021

Typing intently on her laptop at Magpie Cafe, Lindsey Duga looks like any other young professional getting an early morning start. But what she’s up to isn’t sending emails or prepping for meetings. She’s working on her next novel.

By day, Duga is the director of accounts at the web development firm Gatorworks. But after hours (and before), she’s a successful fiction writer with five published young adult novels—and more in the pipeline.

Duga, 31, says her writing passion took root in middle school.

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Writing Insights: Can an Editor or Agent Assure I Will Be Published?

authorlink.com – Wednesday September 1, 2021

A writer asked me this question on Quora, “Is there any editor who will work as a literary agent as well, or at least who can connect me with an agent for sure so that it can be assured that my money for editing will not fall in vain?”

The answer is no.

An editor’s role is different from an agent’s role, although some cross-over influences can take place. There are two kinds of editors, one is a freelancer you hire to improve grammar or story development. The other kind of editor works for the publishing house that acquires the story. I assume here we are talking about a freelance editor you pay on a work-for-hire basis.

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How to write your own novel, according to podcaster and author Elizabeth Day

stylist.co.uk – Monday August 30, 2021

Have you always dreamed of putting your own story to paper? Perhaps a compelling crime thriller, or a love story for the ages? Whether you’ve already got a killer plot idea, or it’s a pipe dream that feels too far away to reach, it’s tough knowing where to begin. With the publishing industry announcing a surge in manuscripts as soon as the pandemic hit last year, the competition is as fierce as ever, and expert advice is sorely welcome.

Enter Elizabeth Day. As well as hosting her own hit podcast, How To Fail With Elizabeth Dayand interviewing fellow authors for BBC Sounds show Open Book and Sky Arts’ Book Club Live, Elizabeth has written five novels and two non-fiction books to accompany her podcast series. She started writing her first novel, Scissors Paper Stone, aged 29 while working full-time as a feature writer at The Observer

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3 Tips for Writing Female Friendships in Fiction

writersdigest.com – Tuesday August 24, 2021

“I’d be lost without you.” These words from Nancy Mitford’s Pursuit of Love speak to the primacy of friendships between womena theme that’s poignantly evoked in the wonderful new television adaptation of the novel. The story follows two young women from their days as little girls to melodramatic teenagers and, finally, into womanhood. In losing each other, they lose themselves.

In the history of the novel, it’s a radical sentiment. Novels that center women’s friendships are a relatively recent invention. A mirror of society and culture, the English novel, which became the precursor for the American novel, privileged the marriage plot. Stretching back at least into the 18th century, courtship and marriage provided both the subject and story arc for fiction.

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The Books Briefing: How Fan Fiction Reimagines the Writing Process

theatlantic.com – Monday August 23, 2021

When The Last Jedi came out, some viewers had déjà vu: Certain aspects of the movie’s plot were strikingly similar to the events in several popular stories on the fan-fiction site Archive of Our Own. The coincidence may seem strange, but in many ways it’s unsurprising that the people who were thinking most deeply about a franchise—its creators and devotees alike—would come to the same conclusions about each character’s fate. That alignment might be seen as a testament to both the series’ deep world-building and its fans’ insight.

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