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Writers' News

Call for Names, Editors, and Contributors: Journal/Magazine of Fiction by Academics #CFP

patheos.com – Thursday December 5, 2019

I really shouldn’t start new projects. But I’ve had so many conversations recently with academics in my field about writing fiction that I think the time has come to do something about it. And so I’m going to be announcing soon the launch of a new periodical dedicated to fiction written by academics. This post aims mainly at gauging interest (and more specifically the kinds of interest there may be both from potential contributors and from potentially readers) and tackling a few initial questions that it is better to crowd source now.

[Read the full article]

Curtis Brown Creative launches TV serial writing course

thebookseller.com – Wednesday December 4, 2019

The Curtis Brown Creative writing school is launching a new course in writing an original TV drama serial.

Run in collaboration with Curtis Brown’ TV, film and theatre agents it promises expert teaching and masterclasses from TV directors, producers and showrunners at the firm’s central London offices.

The 18-week course, led by TV writer, playwright and former Birkbeck Professor Colin Teevan, starts in March.

[Read the full article]

Twelfth Annual Papatango New Writing Prize Opens For 2020 Submissions

broadwayworld.com – Tuesday December 3, 2019

The Papatango New Writing Prize, now in its twelfth year, opens for submissions today, Tuesday 3 December 2019, until 9pm on Sunday 2 February 2020.

The Papatango New Writing Prize was the UK's first - and remains the only annual - opportunity guaranteeing a new writer a full production, publication by Nick Hern Books, a royalty of 10% of the gross box office, and a £6500 commission with full developmental support for a follow-up play. It is also unique in producing the winning play within the same year. Since 2019, the winning play has toured the UK following its London premiere.

In addition, every entrant receives feedback on their script - a commitment made by no other company, especially significant as the Prize averages more submissions on a yearly basis than any other playwriting award. Writers nurtured in this way have gone on to see their scripts produced at many leading venues across the UK.

[Read the full article]

Bad Sex Awards 2019: Two writers share 'Britain's most dreaded literary prize'

inews.co.uk – Tuesday December 3, 2019

In an echo of the Booker prize two writers have won the 2019 Literary Review Bad Sex In Fiction Award.

The judges struggled to pick just one winner so chose French author Didier Decoin with his novel The Office of Gardens and Ponds and John Harvey, a life fellow at Emmanuel College, Cambridge, with his book, Pax.

The judges were swayed equally by raunchy passages in Decoin's and Harvey's books.

[Read the full article]

HMH to Launch Children's Graphic Novel Imprint

publishersweekly.com – Friday November 22, 2019

Houghton Mifflin Harcourt is the latest publisher to announce a children’s graphic novel imprint: Etch, which will gather all of HMH’s graphic novels into a single imprint, will debut in September 2020. The launch catalog will consist of seven titles, with plans to publish about 15 books per year.

Publisher Catherine Onder will oversee the imprint, but editors from the HMH children’s imprints Clarion, Versify, and HMH Books for Young Readers will all acquire properties for Etch. “I’ve been so impressed by the passion from the team, across both editorial and design, and the talented roster of creators that they’ve brought on board,” Onder said. “This variety of perspectives, interests, and expertise is key to our providing graphic novels for every reader.”

[Read the full article]

The Rothman Brecher Ehrich Livingston Agency Signs Deal With the WGA

deadline.com – Tuesday November 19, 2019

Respected TV and film literary boutique The Rothman Brecher Ehrich Livingston Agency, a member of Association of Talent Agents, has reached a deal with the Writers Guild.

“Rothman Brecher Ehrich Livingston is pleased to announce that it has signed a new Franchise Agreement with the WGA,” the principals said in a statement to Deadline, declining further comment.

RBEL is the fourth established ATA member mid-size agency to break ranks and sign with the WGA, joining another literary boutique, Kaplan Stahler, as well as  Buchwald and Abrams Artists, and comes only a week after the guild’s most recent pact with Abrams Artists. Verve, which is not an ATA member, was the first notable agency with writer clients to reach an agreement with the WGA in May.

[Read the full article]

Ward, Desser Have New Roles at Random House

publishersweekly.com – Tuesday November 19, 2019

At Penguin Random House's flagship imprint, Andy Ward has been promoted to publisher, while Knopf's Robin Desser has been tapped as senior v-p and editor-in-chief. Ward is replacing Susan Kamil, who died, suddenly, last month.

In an announcement about Ward's promotion, Gina Centrello, president and publisher of Random House, said Ward, who is currently editor-in-chief at RH, has shown "steady, caring stewardship, as well as his own talents as an editor." Centrello said that Ward, in his new role, "will help set the priorities for not just Random House but also the Dial and Hogarth imprints," as well as acquiring and editing.

[Read the full article]

National Centre for Writing seeks working class writers

thebookseller.com – Saturday November 16, 2019

The National Centre for Writing in Norwich is relaunching its Escalator Talent Development Scheme seeing under-represented voices in fiction from the East of England with a special focus this year on writers from working class backgrounds.

Now entering its 15th year, the writing programme is supported by the Arts Councils and has worked with almost 100 writers, helping launch the careers of Michael Donkor (published by 4th Estate), Megan Bradbury (Picador), Miranda Doyle (Faber), Guinevere Glasfurd-Brown (Hodder) and Kate Worsley (Bloomsbury)

The 2020 scheme is keen to receive applications from early career writers who self-identify as from a working class background, or writers who wouldn’t ordinarily have the opportunity to benefit from this kind of support, the National Centre for Writing (NCW) said. “Working class voices remain critically under-represented in contemporary fiction and NCW seeks to address this through Escalator and its talent development programme more broadly,” the Centre added. The Bookseller’s investigation into class earlier this year revealed that around 80% of people in the publishing industry who identify as working class their career has been adversely affected by their background.

[Read the full article]

Strong year for Children's publishing as W H Smith unveils Books of the Year

thebookseller.com – Thursday November 14, 2019

W H Smith has unveiled its Books of the Year, with the retailer recognising two children's books for the first time.

In recognition of the "diverse choice across children’s publishing and the importance it plays in supporting literacy and engagement in young readers", W H Smith has chosen both bestselling rhyming read-aloud picture book Oi Puppies! (Hodder Children's Books) by Kes Gray and Jim Field, and the inclusive Izzy Gizmo and the Invention Convention (Simon & Schuster Children's UK) by Pip Jones and Sara Ogilvie as its Children's Books of the Year. 

Beth O'Leary's debut novel The Flatshare (Quercus), which has sold 15,362 copies through TCM, has been named Fiction Book of the Year. W H Smith said the "brilliant rom-com" story of Tiffy and Leon who share a flat but have never met is "one of the most uplifting debuts of 2019". 

[Read the full article]

One long sentence, 1,000 pages: Lucy Ellmann 'masterpiece' wins Goldsmiths prize

theguardian.com – Thursday November 14, 2019

Lucy Ellmann’s 1,000-page novel Ducks, Newburyport has won the £10,000 Goldsmiths prize for “fiction at its most novel”, praised by judges as a “masterpiece”.

Ducks, Newburyport is the stream-of-consciousness internal monologue of a mother in Ohio as she bakes pies in her kitchen. Made up of one long run-on sentence, with interludes from the perspective of a mountain lion, its ambitious form led to it being turned down by Ellmann’s previous publisher, Bloomsbury. It later found a home at independent press Galley Beggar and was shortlisted for this year’s Booker prize.

Chair of judges, Erica Wagner called the novel “that rare thing: a book which, not long after its publication, one can unhesitatingly call a masterpiece”.

[Read the full article]

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