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Writers' News

The Poetry Swindon Festival begins next week

firstwriter.com – Friday September 23, 2016

Spitfires, a goblin circus and complete nonsense - it can only be the Poetry Swindon Festival.

29 September sees the start of the community festival, kicking off with Poems Aloud, hosted by Hilda Sheehan (we've heard the Mayor of Swindon will be in attendance, reading and bringing his big grin and enthusiasm for poetry, so we're feeling very grown up!).

On Saturday 1 October, Poetry Swindon celebrates the 100th anniversary of Dada, the influential ‘nonsense’ art movement, with anti-verse workshops and open mic with the Tin Women.

[Read the full article]

Bestselling author Jojo Moyes is offering up her cottage as a free writing den

metro.co.uk – Wednesday September 21, 2016

If you’ve ever had dreams of swishing around a cottage in a silk dressing gown as you make a cup of coffee before setting down to write your first novel, then your luck may be in.

Bestselling author Jojo Moyes is offering up her cottage to one writer for a week, to help them escape the rat race and either get started on, or finish up their next literary masterpiece.

[Read the full article]

US publishers' sales decline 2.7% in first quarter

thebookseller.com – Wednesday September 21, 2016

American publishers experienced a 2.7% decline in revenues in the first quarter of 2016 to $2.14bn (£1.65bn) compared to the same period in 2015, according to data released yesterday (20th September) by the Association of American Publishers (AAP).

[Read the full article]

Natasha Fairweather joins RCW

thebookseller.com – Tuesday September 20, 2016

Natasha Fairweather, currently at United Agents, is set to join Rogers, Coleridge & White (RCW) in October.  

Fairweather will be joining the board and taking up a senior role at Rogers, Coleridge & White.    

She began her career as a literary agent at Curtis Brown in 1989, returning to the profession in 1999, at which point Fairweather joined AP Watt after a seven-year hiatus spent living and working in Jerusalem and Moscow. There Fairweather built a list of non-fiction writers including politicians, historians and journalists, and also represents a growing number of prize winning novelists. In 2012, when AP Watt was acquired by United Agents, Natasha became co-head of the newly-amalgamated book department.

[Read the full article]

‘The Irish Times’ travel writing competition

irishtimes.com – Saturday September 17, 2016

For the second year, The Irish Times, in conjunction with the Travel Department, is inviting aspiring writers to write a travel feature for consideration for publication in The Irish Times Magazine. The author of the best entry, as selected by our judges, will have their article published in print in The Irish Times Magazine, along with a travel-writing assignment abroad, also for publication in the Magazine.

[Read the full article]

Algorithms Could Save Book Publishing—But Ruin Novels

wired.com – Friday September 16, 2016

JODIE ARCHER HAD always been puzzled by the success ofThe Da Vinci Code. She’d worked for Penguin UK in the mid-2000s, when Dan Brown’s thriller had become a massive hit, and knew there was no way marketing alone would have led to 80 million copies sold. So what was it, then? Something magical about the words that Brown had strung together? Dumb luck? The questions stuck with her even after she left Penguin in 2007 to get a PhD in English at Stanford. There she met Matthew L. Jockers, a cofounder of the Stanford Literary Lab, whose work in text analysis had convinced him that computers could peer into books in a way that people never could.

[Read the full article]

Authors beware: scam publishers are charging up to $15k for shoddy work

stuff.co.nz – Thursday September 15, 2016

Local writers are paying bogus publishers between $5000 and $15,000 per book to get their work published.

For that, they receive an e-book and a few poorly edited print copies of their manuscript, according to the New Zealand Society of Authors — and then they are asked to pay more money to market it. 

"Basically [the 'publishers' are] doing almost nothing, and certainly nothing that gets an author's work out there," says NZSA president Kyle Mewburn, who has noticed an increase in scam complaints in the last year, from one every couple of months to one or two a week.

[Read the full article]

What is women's writing? Publishing insiders discuss power of female voices

theguardian.com – Wednesday September 14, 2016

Writers and editors explored what it means to be a woman in the literary world at an Emily Books event in Brooklyn: ‘The industry is mostly female, but male-run’

[Read the full article]

How Dylan Thomas's writing shed inspired Roald Dahl

bbc.co.uk – Wednesday September 14, 2016

Both are world-famous authors who wrote some of their best known works in their sheds. But, as Roald Dahl's centenary is celebrated across the country, his widow reveals how heavily the children's author was influenced by Dylan Thomas's hut when building his own.

[Read the full article]

Steve Atkinson: HighTide started on a wave of changes in new writing

whatsonstage.com – Tuesday September 13, 2016

HighTide turns ten this year and the UK's premier new writing festival could not be in better shape. Since beginning in the small market town of Halesworth in Suffolk, they've championed the likes of Adam BraceSam HolcroftJoel Horwood and Nick Payne, often staging debuts from those writers well before theatres like the National, Almeida and the Royal Court pick them up. As co-founder of the festival, director Steve Atkinson has been instrumental in pushing the festival artistically so it now stands as one of the most important new writing events in the UK calendar. Now, after they open at the festival's home of Aldeburgh, HighTide plays tour up and down the country, bringing bright, dynamic theatre voices to the rest of the world.

[Read the full article]

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