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Writers' News

New Literary Agency Listing

firstwriter.com – Tuesday September 18, 2018

Handles: Fiction; Nonfiction
Areas: Autobiography; Biography; Business; Culture; Current Affairs; Health; Historical; Lifestyle; Psychology; Sociology; Sport; Technology; Women's Interests
Markets: Adult
Treatments: Literary

Send query by email only. Include "QUERY" in the subject line, and a one-page query letter, which identifies the category of your work, the title, the word count, and provides a brief overview of your project, credentials and previous publishing history, if any. Complete book proposals on request only.

[See the full listing]

New Magazine Listing

firstwriter.com – Monday September 17, 2018

Publishes: Essays; Interviews; Nonfiction; Poetry; Reviews; 
Areas include: Literature; 
Markets: Adult; 
Preferred styles: Contemporary; Literary

Publishes poetry and literary prose. No previously published material. Send up to five poems or a piece of prose via online submission system ($3 charge) or by post with SASE. Accepts simultaneous submissions if notice of acceptance elsewhere is given. Six month response time.

[See the full listing]

Kaplan Stahler Agency Names Cindy Mintz Head of TV Literary

deadline.com – Saturday September 15, 2018

Kaplan Stahler’s Cindy Mintz has been named head of TV Literary at the boutique agency. In her new role, Mintz will oversee a department of five agents.

Mintz joined Kaplan Stahler in 2013 after a brief stint at Abrams Artists Agency, where she was instrumental in launching their TV literary department. Prior to Abrams, she spent 15 years as a TV packaging agent at ICM Partners.

[Read the full article]

Penguin Random House Is Building the Perfect Publishing House

newrepublic.com – Wednesday September 12, 2018

When Penguin and Random House announced in the fall of 2012 that they intended to merge, Hurricane Sandy was barreling toward New York City, America’s publishing capital. It was an instant metaphor for headline writers: “As Sandy Loomed, the Publishing Industry Panicked.” People inside both companies worried about their jobs; people outside the companies worried about the market power of a new conglomerate comprised of the country’s two largest trade publishers. Agents and authors, meanwhile, worried that the consolidation would further drive down advances.

Random House’s top brass insisted that there was no need to panic. “The continuity will far outweigh the change,” Markus Dohle, the CEO of what would become Penguin Random House, told The New York Times when the merger was completed the following summer. “We have the luxury to take the time before we make any strategic decisions. There is no need to rush.”

[Read the full article]

New Literary Agency Listing

firstwriter.com – Wednesday September 12, 2018

Handles: Fiction; Nonfiction
Areas: Autobiography; Biography; Crime; Culture; Current Affairs; Entertainment; Erotic; Fantasy; Film; Horror; Humour; Music; Mystery; Sci-Fi; Suspense; Thrillers
Markets: Adult; Youth
Treatments: Commercial; Contemporary; Dark; Literary; Mainstream; Popular; Positive; Progressive; Satirical; Serious; Traditional

Currently selling a lot of nonfiction books but more focused on finding commercial novels now. Seeking ambitious epic books with attractive characters to lend themselves for movie adaptations. Think big! Check out the detailed Q&A with me on my agency Facebook site as it will give you a lot of info about why I might be the right agent for you.

[See the full listing]

Scottish crime author Val McDermid got into writing for the money – and reveals why she loves ‘books with dead bodies’

thescottishsun.co.uk – Tuesday September 11, 2018

AUTHOR Val McDermid remembers the exact moment she knew she’d be a writer — when she read in a kids’ story that you could get PAID to pen books.

Award-winning Val, who has sold more than 40 million of her crime novels, said it was the popular Chalet School stories that sparked her future career.

She said: “The moment of realisation came for me when I was nine years old.

“I used to read the Chalet Girls books and one of the characters grew up to become a writer.

“I remember distinctly reading it — it was on a right-hand page about halfway down, about her getting a cheque from her publisher.

“I thought, ‘Oh my god, you can get paid money for this?’ I don’t know if I thought people maybe just wrote out of the goodness of their heart and the books arrived on the shelves.

“But I thought I could do that, I could tell stories and lies, and I could get paid money for it.

“From then, when people asked what I was going to do when I grew up I said a writer and people would laugh, people from my background didn’t do that.”

[Read the full article]

E-book pricing: because you’re worth it

irishtimes.com – Monday September 10, 2018

You’re a self-published author. You’re digitally publishing and you are responsible for pricing your e-book. How do you decide the price?

There are two schools of thought in the interminable self-publishing pricing discussion. One believes firmly in the pile ’em high and sell ’em cheap philosophy. The other side holds that to be a horrible undervaluation of our talents and time.

I’m firmly in the second camp. I’ve long been of the opinion that self-published authors selling at “remaindered bin” prices are doing themselves, and self-publishing authors generally, a huge disservice. They’re not valuing their own work sufficiently highly, and they’re encouraging readers to place less value on independently published work than traditionally published. They’re saying, “my book is not as good as one you would find in a bookshop, so I can’t charge as much for it. The only way I can encourage you to buy it is if I either give it away free, or charge what a bookshop would charge for books that nobody wants (the ‘remaindered bin’)”.

Why has that become an accepted tactic?

[Read the full article]

New Literary Agency Listing

firstwriter.com – Friday September 7, 2018

Handles: Fiction
Areas: Adventure; Humour; Mystery
Markets: Children's; Youth

Accepts submissions across all genres and age ranges in children's books. Send query by email with a description of your book, author bio, and literary or relevant professional credits, and first three chapters (or roughly 25 pages) for novels, or complete ms if your work is a picture book. No picture books over 1,000 words. Response in 6-8 weeks.

[See the full listing]

Should writers only write what they know? What I learned from my research

theconversation.com – Tuesday September 4, 2018

As an academic in creative writing, I attend a lot of literary events. One question I can always count on being asked is, “can I write characters of other backgrounds?” This has been a growing concern since Lionel Shriver at the 2016 Brisbane Writers Festival unleashed a tirade against what she called “censorship” in writing – referring to criticism of her book The Mandibles.

The recent ABC Q&A episode, Stranger Than Fiction, in conjunction with the Melbourne Writers’ Festival, showed the many sides of the “write what you know” debate. Dr Michael Mohammed Ahmad and Sofie Laguna argued that space should be given for marginalised groups to represent themselves. Maxine Beneba Clarke pointedly discussed when appropriation can be harmful, as was the case with Shriver’s representation of Latino and African American characters. Meanwhile, Trent Dalton argued that appropriation leads to a good story, which also takes empathy and care.

[Read the full article]

West Side Publishing Will Launch Little Grasshopper Books

publishersweekly.com – Saturday September 1, 2018

Children's publisher West Side Publishing is launching a new imprint, Little Grasshopper Books, likely by the end of the year. The imprint will encompass a wide variety of fiction and nonfiction formats, from board books to books with virtual-reality components, primarily aimed for children five and under.

The new imprint marks West Side Publishing owner Lou Weber’s re-entry into the world of children’s books. As president and founder of Publications International (PIL), a publisher of automotive titles, cookbooks, inspirational formats, and brain games and puzzle books, Weber was long involved in children’s publishing—especially licensed sound books and interactive formats—until PIL sold its children’s publishing unit to Chinese-owned company Phoenix International Publications in 2014. The latter continues to operate the business under the PI Kids name.

[Read the full article]

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