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Writers' News

Point of View Quickly Brings a Story to Life

By G. Miki Hayden
Instructor at Writer's Digest University online and private writing coach

firstwriter.com – Wednesday December 4, 2019

Intimacy with characters will hook your readers

A close point of view, whether first person or third, will supply the inner meaning to a story. Such an intimate point of view brings to any piece of fiction insight, warmth, understandable human foibles, and an empathetic reader attraction to the character. This “limited” point of view facilitates a direct transmission of emotion. Without such a specific character perspective, all the readers have to enlighten them is outer description—although externals can, of course, go a long way to pointing to feeling and shoring up emotional declarations.

[Read the full article]

New Magazine Listing

firstwriter.com – Wednesday December 4, 2019

Publishes: Essays; Fiction; Interviews; Nonfiction; Poetry;
Areas include: Humour; Science; Short Stories;
Markets: Adult

Magazine for scientists and non-scientists, publishing profiles, interviews, essays, humour, cartoons, reviews, poetry, and fiction related to science (but no science fiction). Send submissions by email.

[See the full listing]

New Literary Agency Listing: The Bravo Blue Agency

firstwriter.com – Wednesday December 4, 2019

"We are on the lookout for brilliantly written, original and commercial works of children’s and young adult fiction, narrative non-fiction, literary novels and genre fiction. We believe in a great story over and above everything else, and we have a soft spot for the delightfully macabre."

[See the full listing]

Twelfth Annual Papatango New Writing Prize Opens For 2020 Submissions

broadwayworld.com – Tuesday December 3, 2019

The Papatango New Writing Prize, now in its twelfth year, opens for submissions today, Tuesday 3 December 2019, until 9pm on Sunday 2 February 2020.

The Papatango New Writing Prize was the UK's first - and remains the only annual - opportunity guaranteeing a new writer a full production, publication by Nick Hern Books, a royalty of 10% of the gross box office, and a £6500 commission with full developmental support for a follow-up play. It is also unique in producing the winning play within the same year. Since 2019, the winning play has toured the UK following its London premiere.

In addition, every entrant receives feedback on their script - a commitment made by no other company, especially significant as the Prize averages more submissions on a yearly basis than any other playwriting award. Writers nurtured in this way have gone on to see their scripts produced at many leading venues across the UK.

[Read the full article]

Bad Sex Awards 2019: Two writers share 'Britain's most dreaded literary prize'

inews.co.uk – Tuesday December 3, 2019

In an echo of the Booker prize two writers have won the 2019 Literary Review Bad Sex In Fiction Award.

The judges struggled to pick just one winner so chose French author Didier Decoin with his novel The Office of Gardens and Ponds and John Harvey, a life fellow at Emmanuel College, Cambridge, with his book, Pax.

The judges were swayed equally by raunchy passages in Decoin's and Harvey's books.

[Read the full article]

New Magazine Listing

firstwriter.com – Thursday November 28, 2019

Publishes: Essays; Fiction; Interviews; Nonfiction; Poetry; Reviews;
Areas include: Short Stories;
Markets: Adult

Publishes fiction, poetry, essays, interviews and reviews from or about South Asia and its diasporas. Submit online via online submission system.

[See the full listing]

New Magazine Listing

firstwriter.com – Tuesday November 26, 2019

Publishes: Essays; Fiction; Interviews; Nonfiction; Poetry;
Areas include: Short Stories;
Markets: Adult;
Preferred styles: Literary

Online literary magazine. Send fiction or essays up to 4,000 words through Submittable or through specific email address, or 3-5 unpublished poems in the body of an email. See website for different email addresses for different types of submissions.

[See the full listing]

HMH to Launch Children's Graphic Novel Imprint

publishersweekly.com – Friday November 22, 2019

Houghton Mifflin Harcourt is the latest publisher to announce a children’s graphic novel imprint: Etch, which will gather all of HMH’s graphic novels into a single imprint, will debut in September 2020. The launch catalog will consist of seven titles, with plans to publish about 15 books per year.

Publisher Catherine Onder will oversee the imprint, but editors from the HMH children’s imprints Clarion, Versify, and HMH Books for Young Readers will all acquire properties for Etch. “I’ve been so impressed by the passion from the team, across both editorial and design, and the talented roster of creators that they’ve brought on board,” Onder said. “This variety of perspectives, interests, and expertise is key to our providing graphic novels for every reader.”

[Read the full article]

Why are great women writers still adopting male pseudonyms?

stylist.co.uk – Friday November 22, 2019

There are some interesting things you may or may not know about Nuneaton-born writer, George Eliot. In 2015, her landmark book, Middlemarch (1872), topped a BBC poll of the 100 greatest British novels and it’s been cited as one of the finest works ever written by such diverse writers as Virginia Woolf and Martin Amis. 

But as well as her literary prowess, Eliot was also steeped in scandal. First she was ostracised by polite society for living openly with a married man, George Lewes. And then, after his death, her reputation took a further tumble when she married a man 20 years her junior only for him to attempt suicide on their honeymoon balcony in Venice.

To put it succinctly, the woman born Mary Ann or Marian Evans in 1819 is one of Britain’s greatest writers, having also written the stone-cold classics Adam Bede (1859), The Mill On The Floss (1860) and Silas Marner (1861) to name just a few. Yet Eliot remains something of an enigma.

In part, it’s thanks to her image as a slightly dour Victorian writer (her novels fell out of favour in the early 20th century only to be reappraised in the 1950s), but also, and more importantly, because of her male pen name. But just why did she feel the need to write under this false identity?

[Read the full article]

New Magazine Listing

firstwriter.com – Friday November 22, 2019

Publishes: Poetry;
Markets: Adult;
Preferred styles: Literary

Daily online publication of haiku and micro-poems. Submit online using website submission form.

[See the full listing]

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