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Writers' News

Stephen King's mansion in the town that influenced It to host writing retreats

independent.co.uk – Friday October 18, 2019

Stephen King's home in Bagnor, Maine is being turned into a writer's retreat after the author and his wife, Tabitha, were granted permission to rezone the mansion as a non-profit. 

The building will now become an archive of King's work, where visits will be possible by appointment, and host up to five writers at a time. The family are unlikely to be home while the writers' residencies are ongoing. 

City councillor Ben Sprague told Rolling Stone"The King family has been wonderful to the city of Bangor over time and have donated literally millions of dollars to various causes in the community.

[Read the full article]

Eurospan acquires Transatlantic Publishers Group

thebookseller.com – Thursday October 17, 2019

Eurospan has acquired academic and educational sales agency Transatlantic Publishers Group for an undisclosed sum. 

TGP offers US specialist academic and technical presses sales and marketing services in Europe and the Middle East. The agency was founded in 2002 and current clients include American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics (AIAA), Industrial Press, SAP Press and Kendall-Hunt Publishing.

Transatlantic m.d. Mark Chaloner will be stepping down from his post after a brief handover period. TPG will continue to use Orca Book Services for warehousing and fulfillment services in place of Eurospan’s sister distribution company Turpin Books. 

[Read the full article]

Mundy sets up UK outpost of ACM US

thebookseller.com – Thursday October 17, 2019

Toby Mundy is to head up the new British arm of the US-based Aevitas Creative Management (ACM), with industry veterans Trevor Dolby and Natalie Jerome among the agents joining him.

Mundy will merge his Toby Mundy Associates (TMA), the agency he launched in 2014, with the newly-minted ACM UK and act as the British outpost’s chairman and c.e.o. 

Mundy said he loved running TMA, but “by being part of something larger, we will be able to offer our clients more”. He added: “I think long-term success in this industry comes from great people working in a great culture. The creative, collaborative, and collegial atmosphere at ACM has been foundational to its success and I believe that by working with the outstanding team in the US, we can build something similar here.”  

[Read the full article]

One Neat Trick to Writing Great Mystery Plots

vulture.com – Thursday October 17, 2019

I spend a lot of time thinking about a Raymond Chandler quote I once read. “The perfect detective story cannot be written,” he said. “The type of mind which can evolve the perfect problem is not the type of mind that can produce the artistic job of writing.”

Well — shoot. It has the ring of truth to it, unfortunately. Almost every writer seems to start out interested either in narrative or talking, story or language, before filling in the rest later. This is why it’s funny when literary novelists who couldn’t write a competent John Wick novelization (I put this challenge squarely to A.S. Byatt) call J.K. Rowling a bad writer. She’s an indifferent stylist, sure, but in most of the other ways a writer can be “good” — character, plot, imagination — she’s brilliant. Past brilliant. Meanwhile Chandler, whom many of the same people (rightly) revere, could never, as he freely admitted, explain who killed the chauffeur in The Big Sleep.

The contemporary novelist who comes closest to real parity between story and art may be Tana French. Her most striking gift is for voice, but if her plots aren’t flawless, you can see nonetheless how hard she works to make them very, very good, with just an occasional faint seam showing, nothing more. But that’s almost certainly a product of tenacity and intelligence, not instinct. I would bet French has spent more time thinking about structure than Agatha Christie — who hatched her perfect plots in the bathtub, serenely eating apples — ever did.

[Read the full article]

New Publisher Listing

firstwriter.com – Wednesday October 16, 2019

Publishes: Fiction;
Areas include: Humour; Short Stories;
Markets: Adult;
Preferred styles: Literary

Publishes novels and short story collections between 45,000 and 100,000 words. Only accepts work from writers who have not yet published a book of literary fiction. Particularly looking for female and LGBTQ voices. Submit via online submission system. $7.13 fee per submission.

[See the full listing]

New Literary Agent Listing: Rachel Ekstrom

firstwriter.com – Wednesday October 16, 2019

Agent at Folio Literary Literary Management, handling fiction and nonfiction for adults, children, and young adults. Send query by email with writing sample.

[See the full listing]

Removing the Mystery From Mystery Writing: 13 Tricks Used by Acclaimed Novelists

vulture.com – Tuesday October 15, 2019

What makes reading a good mystery so satisfying? A writer’s hard work. A complex story à la Gone Girl doesn’t just pop out of a writer’s brain fully formed on a random Tuesday. Giving readers what they crave is about structure and pacing and, ultimately, originality. In 2019, it’s also about writing characters with more depth than your archetypal male dick motivated by some dead girl who maybe, if she’s lucky, gets to have a name.

To learn more about the elements of great mystery architecture, Vulture asked eight masters of the form to anatomize their thinking, from the most conceptual level down to the technical details. None of their tips or habits are compulsory, and some even contradict one another, but together they represent craft perfected to the level of art. (Spoiler: Literal crafts are sometimes involved.)

[Read the full article]

Experts reveal their top tips for how to write a book

goodhousekeeping.com – Tuesday October 15, 2019

If you want to know how to write a book, we've got the answer. While it's a daunting task, it's not impossible and here, experts share their top tips to help you get published.

November marks National Novel Writing Month, a global initiative which aims to inspire and encourage writers across the world.

The goal is to write 50,000 words in a month – which sounds daunting but in fact is just over 1000 a day. So if you’ve always wanted to know how to write a book, now is the perfect time.

[Read the full article]

10 Tips for Writing (Both About Yourself and in General)

juneauempire.com – Sunday October 13, 2019

One of my favorite (and simultaneously most hated) qualities of children is their tendency to be unintentionally blunt.

Over the past year, my daughter, son and their little parliament of friends have called me out on hiding my baldness with a Yankees cap, wearing the same clothes every day and “having claws” (read: grossly unclipped toenails). I don’t even want to tell you the comments I hear at the pool. Suffice to say I need to cut back on the midnight Nutella spoons.

Earlier this week, the apples of my eye point-blankedly asked me why I didn’t have a job. I told them that wasn’t true, that I was a writer, to which they both responded: “no, a real job.” So I printed a copy of my curriculum vitae. I still don’t think they were impressed — even after they checked my references.

[Read the full article]

New Literary Agent Listings: Jamie Chambliss and Sonali Chanchani

firstwriter.com – Thursday October 10, 2019

Jamie Chambliss and Sonali Chanchani are literary agents at Folio Literary Management, handling both fiction and nonfiction. See their individual listings for specific areas of interests.

[See the full listing]

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