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Writers' News

No, e-book sales are not falling, despite what publishers say

fortune.com – Saturday September 26, 2015

A recent piece in the New York Times about a decline in e-book sales had more than a whiff of anti-digital Schadenfreude about it. The story, which was based on sales figures from the Association of American Publishers, implied that much of the hype around e-books had evaporated — with sales falling by 10% in the first half of this year — while good old printed books were doing better than everyone expected.

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Why are men so bad at writing sex scenes?

telegraph.co.uk – Friday September 25, 2015

So, Morrissey is terrible at writing about sex. The only surprising thing about this is that so many people seem surprised: realistically, expecting the famously-once-celibate author of the line ‘There are explosive kegs/between my legs' to pen a tender exploration of lovemaking is a bit like expecting Eminem to write a genre-defining pirate romance novel.

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New Literary Agency Listing

firstwriter.com – Friday September 25, 2015

Handles: Fiction; Nonfiction;
Areas: Biography; Cookery; Current Affairs; Historical;
Markets: Adult;
Treatments: Commercial; Literary

No Young Adult or children's. Query through form on website in first instance.

[See the full listing]

New Publisher Listing

firstwriter.com – Thursday September 24, 2015

Publishes: Fiction; Nonfiction; Poetry;
Markets: Adult; Children's; Youth

Small independent publishing company, publishing fiction, poetry, nonfiction and graphic novels for adults, young adults, and children. Review books on website to see if yours is a fit, and if so query Acquisitions Editor by phone. See website for more details.

[See the full listing]

Why writing a book through letters is beautiful and wild

theguardian.com – Wednesday September 23, 2015

Author Leah Thomas is in love with letters, that spill their messy, chaotic, over-sharing, unreliably narrated content out into the world – and that's why she wrote her epistolary novel Because You'll Never Meet Me.

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Super-agent Andrew “The Jackal” Wylie may inherit another large chunk of the world’s literary talent

qz.com – Wednesday September 23, 2015

Andrew Wylie, one of the world's most powerful literary agents, may soon gain even more sway as the representative of three more Nobel Prize-winning authors.

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New Magazine Listing

firstwriter.com – Wednesday September 23, 2015

Publishes: Essays; Fiction; Nonfiction; Poetry;
Areas include: Short Stories;
Markets: Adult;
Preferred styles: Literary; Traditional

Publishes fiction, creative nonfiction, and poetry. Submit up to three poems maximum per submission. $5 reading fee for non-subscribers. Submit online using online submission system. Closed to submissions during July and August.

[See the full listing]

“Keep Dying! Keep Writing It Down!” C.K. Williams’ Final Poems Capture the Velocity of Death

flavorwire.com – Tuesday September 22, 2015

C.K. Williams, whose poetry of moral and political probity spread outward from unsparing introspection, died at his home in Hopewell, New Jersey on Sunday at the age of 78. Williams is survived by his wife Catherine, who told the New York Times that he died of multiple myeloma.

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The Women’s Podcast: Sexism in Publishing, Culture Night and Sex Apps

irishtimes.com – Monday September 21, 2015

New York-based writer Catherine Nichols sent her new novel to literary agents under a man's name and received over eight times the number of responses than she had under her own name.

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Between the novel and the book

thebookseller.com – Monday September 21, 2015

What do Hard Times, Middlemarch, Crime and Punishment, War and Peace, and many more of the greatest novels ever published have in common?

When they were first published, they were not published as books. They were published serially.

People unfamiliar with the history of something tend to assume that what they've always known is the way things have always been. That's why most people think the 20th-century model of publishing, which favoured the publication of novels in book rather than serial format (I call it the "Doorstopper Model"), is a "traditional" form of publishing. It's not.

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