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What Writing His First Novel Taught Author Ted Bell About Writing His Ninth Novel

huffingtonpost.com – Wednesday September 30, 2015

"I can't predict what's going to happen with movie deals but I can predict what's going to happen with Putin."

After he said it over the phone, author Ted Bell and I chuckled. It was mid-morning on a Monday. Bell and I could hear one another over the line, sipping our coffee (he in Northern California, I in Southern California). We were wrapping up a telephone interview on Bell's writing career and the release of his new book Patriot.

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The Secret of Writing An Action Movie in Book Form

io9.com – Tuesday September 29, 2015

A great novel can be just as exciting and thrilling as a big-budget Hollywood tentpole. A novel can contain massive, insane action, that movie-makers could never even afford to bring to life. But how do you create an action movie on the page? We talked to 10 of our favorite authors, and here's what they told us.

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What Has Surprised You About The Writing Life? Intriguing Answers From Acclaimed Authors

huffingtonpost.com – Monday September 28, 2015

I've had the great fortune of interviewing many acclaimed authors. They always have much to say about the craft of writing. One of the questions I've asked often has been "What has surprised you about the writing life?"

Here is what some of those widely read authors said...

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What I learned from writing over 800,000 words in two years

thenextweb.com – Saturday September 26, 2015

Writing didn't come naturally to me, therefore I had to set daily intentions.When I decided I wanted to write more consistently, I sat down at my laptop one day and popped open a Word doc. I stared at the blinking cursor on that blank white page for what felt like forever. That's about the time that I disappeared into the catacombs of YouTube.

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Why are men so bad at writing sex scenes?

telegraph.co.uk – Friday September 25, 2015

So, Morrissey is terrible at writing about sex. The only surprising thing about this is that so many people seem surprised: realistically, expecting the famously-once-celibate author of the line ‘There are explosive kegs/between my legs' to pen a tender exploration of lovemaking is a bit like expecting Eminem to write a genre-defining pirate romance novel.

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Why writing a book through letters is beautiful and wild

theguardian.com – Wednesday September 23, 2015

Author Leah Thomas is in love with letters, that spill their messy, chaotic, over-sharing, unreliably narrated content out into the world – and that's why she wrote her epistolary novel Because You'll Never Meet Me.

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“Keep Dying! Keep Writing It Down!” C.K. Williams’ Final Poems Capture the Velocity of Death

flavorwire.com – Tuesday September 22, 2015

C.K. Williams, whose poetry of moral and political probity spread outward from unsparing introspection, died at his home in Hopewell, New Jersey on Sunday at the age of 78. Williams is survived by his wife Catherine, who told the New York Times that he died of multiple myeloma.

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Between the novel and the book

thebookseller.com – Monday September 21, 2015

What do Hard Times, Middlemarch, Crime and Punishment, War and Peace, and many more of the greatest novels ever published have in common?

When they were first published, they were not published as books. They were published serially.

People unfamiliar with the history of something tend to assume that what they've always known is the way things have always been. That's why most people think the 20th-century model of publishing, which favoured the publication of novels in book rather than serial format (I call it the "Doorstopper Model"), is a "traditional" form of publishing. It's not.

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OF WORDS AND WILL | I’m Just a Manuscript

cornellsun.com – Wednesday September 16, 2015

You probably heard the Schoolhouse Rock song "I'm Just a Bill" at some point in grade school. For anyone who missed out on such a key part of childhood: The song follows the journey of a legislative bill as he hopes to become a national law. After much back and forth between collaborators — and some instrumental breaks — the bill eventually receives the stamp of approval and becomes a law.

This summer I interned for Folio Literary Management, which is a literary agency based in New York City. As I learned about the publishing industry, I couldn't help but notice that the process of getting published mirrors the catchy "I'm Just a Bill." True to the song, writing a book manuscript is only half the battle — authors must work their way through interns, literary agents, editors and publishers in order to see their book on a shelf at Barnes and Noble.

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How To Handle Rejection of Your Writing, Without Becoming a Basket Case

io9.com – Wednesday September 16, 2015

Rejection is part of being a writer. Unless you're that one-in-a-billion wunderkind who gets "discovered" while you're still in high school and goes on to become a literary sensation. Almost everybody who writes stories (or anything) has their work dismissed and sent packing, over and over. And learning to deal with rejection is a crucial part of getting better at this crazy game—both the writing part, and the selling part. But it never gets easy.

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