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The 15 Stages of Sitting Down to Write

bustle.com – Wednesday May 11, 2016

We all know that the life of a professional writer is exciting, glamorous, and filled with unqualified success. The only downside to a career in writing is the actual writing. Writing, as most people already know, is impossible. If you've ever tried to write something, be it a novel or a term paper, you're probably well acquainted with the struggle of actually sitting down to write.

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Know a budding writer? Roddy Doyle has ten tips to get them writing

irishtimes.com – Wednesday May 11, 2016

It’s there in front of you - the blank space with the  blinking cursor or the empty page in a notebook.  Your fingers grasp the pencil or the pen;  your hands hover  over the keyboard. There’s so much to say but  how to start and, once started,  how to keep going?   That’s the challenge. You and only you can do it, and you wouldn’t have it any other way.

Here's Roddy Doyle with some tips.

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Five famous novels turned down by publishers

telegraph.co.uk – Wednesday May 11, 2016

Stephen King received so many rejection letters for Carrie that he kept them all on a spike in his bedroom. When it was finally published in 1974 it was a runaway success, and the paperback sold more than a million copies in its first year.

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How To Write A Book When You Have A Full-Time Job

elitedaily.com – Tuesday May 10, 2016

It took me five minutes to write this sentence.

Five minutes of staring into space until the idea of writing an opening line about how long it took me to think of an opening line popped into my head.

In the grand scheme of things, five minutes isn’t all that long. But for a writer, five minutes for nine words can add up.

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Mark Billingham: why research comes last, and other crime-writing tricks

irishtimes.com – Monday May 9, 2016

Research can get you into trouble. It’s important, of course, but there are pitfalls. An obvious one – especially when writing dark crime novels – is that you can occasionally find yourself dealing with someone who doesn’t see the world in quite the way you do and certainly shouldn’t be left alone with sharp objects. Once, after posting on a forensic anthropology website for information on the speed at which a body might decompose under a particular set of circumstances, I received the following email.

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Writing crime with Donna Leon, Duncan Campbell and Barry Forshaw – books podcast

theguardian.com – Friday May 6, 2016

In this week’s podcast, we investigate the enduring appeal of crime in literature. Duncan Campbell, for decades one of the UK’s most distinguished crime correspondents, looks back through a murky history that began with reports of hangings in the 17th century, assisted in the birth of the novel with Daniel Defoe’s Moll Flanders and has been conflating fact and fiction ever since. 
He’s joined by Barry Forshaw, a walking encyclopedia of noir, who explains why the British tradition of crime writing walks to a different beat than the rest of the world.

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Guest post by TR Ragan: Writing in different genres

hypable.com – Wednesday May 4, 2016

TR Ragan joins us to talk about her experiences in writing across different genres, including both romance and thrillers.

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How To Write A Novel (And Actually Get It Published)

elleuk.com – Wednesday May 4, 2016

Google ‘how to write a novel’ and there are 237 million results to choose from: factual ‘how to’ manuals; rose-tinted listicles from authors who did it; self-styled experts with formulas for writing a bestseller in 100 days... I read them all. But the best advice was five words from Tom Clancy - how do you write a book? 'Just tell the damn story.'

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My writing day: Jacqueline Wilson

theguardian.com – Friday April 29, 2016

I once wrote in a Lett’s School-Girl’s Diary “It would be so wonderful to be a proper writer when I’m grown up. Imagine what bliss it would be to stay at home all day and just write!” Well, I’m a writer now, proper or improper, but sadly I don’t often get to stay at home all day and write. I meet journalists, I go to endless meetings, I do charity work, I talk at festivals, I take part in conferences, I lecture at universities, I visit ill children, I open libraries, I talk on panels, I give interviews on radio and television, and I judge all kinds of competitions. It’s all very interesting and enjoyable, if a bit nerve-racking at times, but it’s ultra time-consuming. It’s difficult managing to produce two full-length books each year. I cope by writing early every morning – even Christmas morning.

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Are most romance novels badly written?

theguardian.com – Monday April 18, 2016

Isabel Allende more than annoyed crime fiction writers a couple of years ago when, after writing her first mystery Ripper, she said that “I’m not a fan of mysteries” because they are “too gruesome, too violent, too dark; there’s no redemption there”. Instead, Allende said, she decided to “take the genre, write a mystery that is faithful to the formula and to what the readers expect, but it is a joke”.

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