Traditional Publishing
Self-Publishing
Share

Is Writing For Free Ever OK? There's A Fine Line Between Exposure And Exploitation

bustle.com – Thursday October 27, 2016

Writing is a tough gig. There's just no way around that. Whether you want to write in print for a magazine, or for your favorite website, there's a lot of time and work to be done before you get there. One of the biggest controversies in the writing community is the idea of writing for free. It sounds simple enough to tell someone, 'Never write for free,' but the reality is more complicated than that. In a perfect world we could maybe tell writers never to write for free, but in the real world, we have to make sacrifices from time to time.

[Read the full article]

Horror Authors Take a Stab at Self-Publishing

publishersweekly.com – Saturday October 22, 2016

Every literary genre has its subgenres, but there is perhaps no genre so packed with niches as horror fiction. You’ve got your supernatural horror, postapocalyptic horror, fantasy horror, sci-fi horror, comedy horror, and then all the vampire, werewolf, and zombie horror. It’s a long list of genres for the long list of authors who self-publish in this increasingly fractured and versatile category.

Some horror writers are making a killing at self-publishing, but that’s far from the norm. More likely, self-published horror writers are seizing independence to get out work that isn’t finding a home with traditional presses—and many of them are passionate enough to keep going despite making little profit.

[Read the full article]

Design Options for Self-Publishers

publishersweekly.com – Saturday October 22, 2016

Book design may be the most self-effacing form of design anywhere. After all, its mission is to so perfectly smooth the interaction between author and reader that the designer disappears from the equation. If a book is readable, enjoyable, easy to interact with, and seamlessly communicates the ideas of the author, I would say the design is a success because nobody notices it.

[Read the full article]

It’s Time for Publishers to Think Outside the Market

digitalbookworld.com – Tuesday October 18, 2016

Over the last 12-18 months, after a challenging, industry-evolving 5-7 years, there is a growing sense of cautious positivity in many parts of the book world. Print book sales are rebounding (or at least not still sliding, depending on whom you listen to), and ebook sales are now on a more predictable, if slower, and more diverse trajectory.

[Read the full article]

This week in fiction: Ottessa Moshfegh on writing predators and their victims

newyorker.com – Monday October 17, 2016

The inspiration for writing “An Honest Woman” came when I met someone who was so physically unattractive I felt sorry for him, and so I kept mum and polite while he lamely attempted to seduce me. I never called attention to the fact that his motivations were transparent and that, by ignoring him, I was protecting his dignity. I was in denial, and he was delusional.

[Read the full article]

10 Writing Prompts To Get You Started On Your Next Manuscript

bustle.com – Thursday October 13, 2016

The best part about writing for yourself, and not for a class, is that there's no teacher to tell you what to write... but the worst part aboutwriting for yourself is also that there's no teacher to tell you what to write. Even the most accomplished writers occasionally find themselves staring at a blinking cursor on a blank screen. Inspiration doesn't always strike on command. So here are a few helpful writing prompts, to get you started when you can't quite find the right words.

[Read the full article]

What really happens to manuscripts sent to publishers?

abc.net.au – Monday October 10, 2016

There's a lot of mystery surrounding the book publishing process. But what really happens to the slush pile of unsolicited manuscripts that are sent to publishers by wannabe writers?

[Read the full article]

BBC National Short Story winner – a plea to publishers to take risks

theguardian.com – Friday October 7, 2016

Since winning the BBC National Short Story award this week for “Disappearances”, I have been asked whether I am writing a novel. This is something that happens to short story writers. I have responded obliquely. There are good reasons for this: most importantly, one of the exciting aspects of writing is finding the form appropriate to the subject you are exploring – whatever it may be.

[Read the full article]

Greg Jackson: 'Writing a novel is like an interminable family vacation'

theguardian.com – Thursday October 6, 2016

"Hello?” Skype blinks across the Atlantic to reveal Greg Jackson in his Brooklyn apartment on a boiling afternoon. One of his characters may use the video chat app to keep in touch with her “dysphoric” dogs, but the debut author confesses he’s unused to such communication himself. And though he’s warm and forthcoming, with the air of a slightly worried Buddha, he does seem a little cautious.

This is unsurprising for a number of reasons – he’s new to media scrutiny, he describes himself (and the other writers he knows) as a “stay-at-home introvert”, and Skype is a peculiar way to talk. But caution, qualification and a keenness to include nuance seem to be part of his style as a person. And they are also characteristic of his striking debut short-story collection, Prodigals, for which the US National Book Foundation last week named him as one of five writers under 35 expected “to make a lasting impression on the literary landsape”.

[Read the full article]

How Jonathan Ames Approaches Writing for TV

splitsider.com – Tuesday October 4, 2016

Jonathan Ames began his career writing novels and performing in small theaters around New York City before landing a job writing and starring in his own pilot for Showtime. As a newcomer to running his own TV show, Ames acclimated himself to the fast-paced position through on-the-job training. After creating and working on three seasons of the HBO cult classic Bored to Death, Ames moved to STARZ to help develop and oversee the Seth MacFarlane-produced Blunt Talk, a comedy centered around popular TV newsman Walter Blunt (Patrick Stewart). Blunt Talkpremiered its second season last night and Ames appears to have found his rhythm as a showrunner. He approaches each season of the show by constructing an “idea document” which is later molded into ten scripts. I spoke with Ames about what it’s like writing comedy for Patrick Stewart, the difference between crafting novels and television scripts, and working on a talk show with Moby.

[Read the full article]

Page of 82 48
Share