Traditional Publishing
Self-Publishing
Share

Is 2017 Your Year To Write And Publish A Book?

forbes.com – Thursday January 12, 2017

Should you write a book this year?  Do you have an idea that you’re convinced the world needs to read about? Consider the strange experience of Mr. Franz Kafka.

[Read the full article]

You Can Write a Best-Seller and Still Go Broke

slate.com – Wednesday January 11, 2017

In 2012, a month after the publication of her memoir, Wild, Cheryl Strayed was on a book tour, soaking up the wonder of her first big success as an author, when her husband texted her to say that their rent check had bounced. “We couldn’t complain to anyone,” Strayed told Manjula Martin, editor of the new anthology Scratch: Writers, Money, and the Art of Making a Living: “My book is on the New York Times best-seller list right now and we do not have any money in our checking account.”

[Read the full article]

The Kindle Effect

fortune.com – Friday December 30, 2016

Consider the metamorphosis of self-publishing. For decades it was dismissed as the desperate refuge of authors rejected by publishing houses, wannabes who paid a fee to a musty vanity press that would dutifully typeset their words and transform them into a few boxes of books that the “writers” could hand out to their friends.

Today, thanks to ebooks and Amazon (AMZN, -2.02%), self-publishing is a global phenomenon—an independent route intentionally chosen by more and more authors—that has spawned not only mega-bestsellers like Fifty Shades of Grey, but also hits in other realms, such as the movie version of The Martian. Ebook self-publishing has become a $1 billion industry.

[Read the full article]

Make this the year you finally write your book

mprnews.org – Friday December 30, 2016

According to a New York Times op-ed from over a decade ago, "81 percent of Americans feel they have a book in them."

If that's still true today, there's almost 200 million American adults roaming the country, dreaming of the novels and memoirs and cookbooks they have yet to write. If even a quarter of them ever move on to the actual writing stage, our bookstores are going to explode.

[Read the full article]

Irish novelist Elizabeth Reapy give her tips on writing a page-turner

irishpost.co.uk – Thursday December 29, 2016

FIRST-TIME novelist Elizabeth Reapy’s debut Red Dirt is a thrilling piece of fiction based on the lives of three Irish emigrants attempting to find their way in Australia.

Here, the Co. Mayo-based author tells Fiona Audley her top tips for any prospective writers…

[Read the full article]

‘I’m at my desk by 9am. I even write on Christmas Day’

theguardian.com – Saturday December 24, 2016

I have been writing every day of my life, seven days a week, for almost 50 years. Even Christmas Day. But I still enjoy it. I have lived in the same house for the last 30 years and I have written in the same room ever since. When I first came to London, I went on a canal boat ride in Little Venice and I remember going past the street where I live now, thinking: “This must be a nice place to live.” I never dreamed that I would one day live here.

My writing room is a cosy, book-lined room, with a dark wooden desk and a window overlooking the garden. There is a little Paddington bear watching over my desk. I am happy here, although on some days, there is rather a lot of traffic on the road and the river and it can be quite noisy.

[Read the full article]

Kiddie-lit publishers try to bring adult classics down to 6-year-old level

seattletimes.com – Thursday December 22, 2016

Kiddie lit has become a surprisingly lucrative and crowded niche. Anxious parents who played Mozart for their babies in utero and showed them Baby Einstein educational videos have snapped up children’s books that promise to turn their offspring into tiny literature lovers.

[Read the full article]

Caimh McDonnell: too funny and too Irish

irishtimes.com – Wednesday December 21, 2016

Publishing used be a lot like a bad country disco. The publishers in this metaphor are the lovely ladies and the authors are the likely lads. I don’t mean that the ladies stand bored on one side of the hall while the lads are on the other skulling pints. No, this is another kind of bad. Imagine a GAA tournament clashed with a young farmer’s convention and the AGM of the Association of People Called Sean. The ladies are so out-numbered, it’s like the film 300 remade as a romcom.

Good news, though, the publishers found a solution. The ladies hired some bouncers to do their rejecting for them – literary agents. As a lonely author looking for love, you’ve now got to convince one of them to dance with you long before any of the girls will consider it.

[Read the full article]

My writing day: Maggie O’Farrell

theguardian.com – Saturday December 17, 2016

Most writers’ work happens when they are away from their desks, when they are looking the other way, when they are engaged with some other mundane task. The washing up, the folding of laundry, the school run, the debate with a small child over the merits and demerits of wearing of a coat in December.

This is, at least, what I try to tell myself. The idea that there is a typical “writing day” makes me laugh, with a slight edge of hysteria. Life with children precludes such planning, such routine, such predictability. Last week, for example, my writing mornings were disrupted and erased by, in no particular order: the cat being copiously indisposed on sofa and carpet; my daughter drawing a seascape of swimming lions on top of some notes I had made; one child sent home ill from school; and another requiring lifts to and from concert rehearsals.

[Read the full article]

A primer on writing from a gifted novelist

usatoday.com – Friday December 16, 2016

Charles Johnson, one of America’s finest novelists (Middle Passage) and foremost thinkers pondering the cosmos of literature, has published a road map to that cosmos as complex, daunting and rewarding as the destination itself. Titled The Way of the Writer: Reflections on the Art and Craft of Storytelling (Scribner, 256 pp., *** out of four stars), this dense little book could just as cogently be called The Rigors of Writing Seriously.

[Read the full article]

Page of 75 38
Share