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Literary agents aren't dead: Shark Tank for books

chicagonow.com – Wednesday May 10, 2017

The publishing landscape is rapidly changing. In the past, any aspiring author needed a publisher and landing a publisher almost always required a literary agent. This has changed with the rise of self-publishing, BUT it's important to keep things in perspective. I'm writing this series (part one here) to give ideas to writers (including myself) on how to navigate the new terrain while also doing somewhat of a myth buster on the notion that literary agents are now somehow extinct.

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7 Things I've Learned About Writing From My Work As An Editor And An Author

bustle.com – Wednesday May 3, 2017

For many years, I worked as both an author and an editor, which always felt a bit like being a double agent. I’d spend the days considering other people’s manuscripts and the nights working on my own, which was something of a balancing act. But I always felt really lucky to have the perspective that comes with being on both sides of the desk. I mean, how many people find one job they love, much less two?

A couple years ago, around the time I started working on my new book, Windfall, I left my job as an editor to write full-time. But if there were unlimited hours in a day, I probably would’ve continued to do both forever. Being an editor absolutely made me a better writer, and being a writer undoubtedly made me a better editor, and I’m still so grateful for all that I learned along the way. So I thought it might be helpful if I shared of few of those lessons with you....

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Literary agents aren't dead (part 1)

chicagonow.com – Wednesday May 3, 2017

There is a current trend, specifically on LinkedIn, to pronounce certain careers dead. It's getting to the point where no line of work seems safe anymore. The LinkedIn morticians have declared an end to everything from working a traditional sales jobs to being a lawyer.

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The 9 Emotional Stages Of Reading Your Childhood Writing

bustle.com – Saturday April 29, 2017

Have you ever stumbled upon an forgotten journal or notebook and read through your old stuff? If so, than you know the many emotional stages you go through when you read your childhood writing. It's a roller coaster ride, to say the least.

From the poetry of my childhood to the Harry Potter-inspired stories of my adolescence to the emotionally-charged journals of my teen years, I have been writing one thing or another for as long as I can remember. If I wasn't up late at night reading with a flashlight under my covers, I was jotting down all of my thoughts, feelings, and ideas, convinced each one was as brilliant as those of the professional writers I looked up to. Whenever I wrote, whatever I wrote, I was always so sure that anytime I put my pen to paper, I was recording a *very important* story that was pure gold. Now that I have a solid decade, not to mention a writing degree and years of experience as a professional, between the writing of my youth and now, I can see clearly now what I couldn't then: I was no Sylvia Plath.

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Giles Foden on the art of writing

irishtimes.com – Thursday April 27, 2017

The foreword to The Ogham Stone, UL’s journal of creative writing, explores what language can do and the craft of its featured writers.

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Accepting imperfections will improve your writing

churchcentral.com – Sunday April 23, 2017

For me to proclaim, “You’re not perfect!” might sound a bit jarring or insulting. But it’s true. And, once you accept that, it will set you free. Free to be a better writer. Not to mention a better spouse, parent, or pastor.  

Why do I say that? I’ve spent more than 40 years as a writer and editor. And I have learned that at the heart of good writing is accepting your imperfections. While good writing is a complex subject that takes a lifetime to even begin to master, there are a few secrets. All are rooted in human fallibility.

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The Secrets of Writing in Multiple Genres

publishersweekly.com – Saturday April 22, 2017

Sarah Dalton writes young adult novels. She’s earned a following among fans of YA genre fiction with such speculative series as Blemished, Mary Hades, and White Hart. Dalton’s big break, however, came under her pen name, Sarah A. Denzil.

Denzil is the author of Silent Child, a psychological thriller about a kidnapped boy, which was the top-selling book in the paid digital category on amazon.co.uk. The thriller was also a top-10 Amazon bestseller in the U.S. and hit #1 in such categories as kidnapping and crime. It’s the English author’s third foray into adult fiction, with her thrillers Saving April (also a top 100 Kindle bestseller in the U.K.) and The Broken Ones released in 2016.

Writing and publishing in two genres under her real name as well as a pen name has been a learning experience for Dalton. “I first and foremost read as many psychological thriller books as I could,” she says of her decision to switch genres. She also followed media coverage of high-profile crimes and kidnappings. “Crime thrillers are trickier,” she notes.

Dalton says that her YA books are relatively “research free,” which allows her to make everything up. So when it came to a setting for Silent Child, Dalton compromised: the setting is a realistic-but-fictional English village. Writing about an actual place comes with constraints, she explains.

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Need Some Writing Inspiration? 7 Poems To Get The Creative Juices Flowing

bustle.com – Monday April 17, 2017

Often, people look for ways to avoid distractions, especially during important work. And, really, what could be more important than your writing? The process of transforming your wildest ideas, your most daring stories, your most beautiful daydreams — well, that's worthy of all your focused energy and then some. Though most of us know the above, that doesn't make it any easier to combat the kagillion-horned monster known as Writers Block. Fortunately, spending a few short minutes with a good poem can get you back at that keyboard — and more synched in with your writing than ever.

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Writer seeks Kindled spirit: Six novelists reveal how to self-publish successfully

dailymail.co.uk – Sunday April 16, 2017

The dawn of the digital era means that authors can self-publish their books – and make a fortune. Laura Silverman asks six independent novelists to reveal the secrets of clicking with your readership.

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Kameron Hurley: How to Write a Book in a Month

locusmag.com – Monday April 10, 2017

We all want to learn how to write books faster. The pace of the news cycle today has heated up to such an extent that for those of us who aren’t in the 1% of writers, if we don’t come out with a book a year, it feels like the world has forgotten us amid the buzz of ever more intensifying world horror. I’m not immune to this pressure. Juggling a day job, a book a year (writing), a book a year (promot­ing), and completing various freelance articles like this one takes its toll. Stuff goes out late. It’s pushed out. It squeezes in just under the wire (like this column). At some point when you’re on the writing treadmill, it feels like you’ve gotten so behind that you’ll never catch up again.

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