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Dear younger writer self, can I give you some advice?

irishtimes.com – Thursday January 25, 2018

Joan Brady on taking the scenic route to write her novel, missing her deadline to go from journalist to author by a mere 20 years.

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I often reward writing a thousand words with a latte and eight jammie dodgers

irishtimes.com – Wednesday January 24, 2018

Louise Beech: Writing without a deal, agent or audience means you can be the most honest you’ll probably ever be

Adversity is a great place for inspiration. It lends a sort of desperation, a need to create and make something good when the world seems against us. It’s not a great place to permanently live, but without experiencing it for at least a good period of time we don’t grow, survive, or scream to be heard. During adversity, we write hungry. I mean this in a spiritual way, not literally, though it can help to be physically hungry too. I often reward writing a thousand words with a latte and eight Jammie Dodgers.

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Why Writing Network Startups Are Banking On Serialized Storytelling

forbes.com – Sunday January 21, 2018

The publishing industry might not be as buzzy as film or TV, but it still attracts its share of startups: Startup database Angel List currently holds 2,261 companies under the "publishing" rubric, at an average valuation of $3.7 million.

Granted, many of these are news curators or offer website templates, but of the fiction-centric startups, the success stories are built on a strongly engaged base of users. How do these writing networks chase engagement? They master the art of page-turning addiction.

Serialized storytelling isn't new. Serialized folklore and literature includes Homer, Dickens, and 1,001 Arabian Nights. The concept adapts to new formats: Pulp fiction has profited from their heroes' endless exploits since the dime store novel, and the 1920s-era Stratemeyer Syndicate further improved on the model with ghostwritten series like Nancy Drew, the Bobsey Twins and the Hardy Boys. These books promoted previous stories at the front of the book and often ended with previews teasing the title of the next installment — and the syndicate even instructed writers to end chapters and even pages mid-scene. The result was a literal $0.50 page-turner.

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Award-Winning Author Judy Blume Shares 6 Inspiring Tips From 50 Years of Writing (and 85 Million Books Sold)

inc.com – Sunday January 21, 2018

When I was a kid I loved to read Judy Blume books: Tales of a Fourth Grade NothingBlubberDeenieFreckle JuiceSuperfudge. They addressed themes and issues other books I was reading at the time didn't cover. Her stories spoke directly to me, as if she could see right into my curious, hyper-sensitive, insecure pre-teen head.

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How to Keep Writing When Every Day Is a Blow to the Gut

huffingtonpost.com – Monday January 15, 2018

Most writers I know have put themselves on a news diet, but even if you’ve done that it’s impossible to escape the bad news altogether—nor do most of us want to be completely checked out. The s**tstorm we’re contending with in our country—#MeToo, our erratic weather, nuclear threats, a Twitter presidency—is leaving most of us feeling anxious at best. Few writers I know are able to wield their anxiety into well-crafted scenes. Most are distracted (for good reason!) and yet the new year is supposed to be about new beginnings, right?

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Five Rules for Writers

nationalreview.com – Saturday January 13, 2018

As a professional writer, I’m always trying to improve. I’ve studied the work of the top writers. I’ve debated great opening sentences with colleagues. I’ve thought long and hard about things like serial commas, concluding that they are good and necessary (don’t @ me).

These days, I’m not only a professional writer, but also a teacher of writing: I run the journalism program at Hillsdale College. The best way to learn how to write is to write, because experience offers the soundest instruction. Yet my students and I also consult sources such as The Elements of Style, by William Strunk Jr. and E. B. White, whose best advice has become a famous dictum: “Omit needless words.”

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NYC author Neil Olson on what it’s like to work in publishing today

amny.com – Tuesday January 9, 2018

Neil Olson is a mainstay in the New York City book scene.

The Massachusetts native started out as an assistant to esteemed literary agents Candida Donadio and Eric Ashworth in 1987, fresh out of Maine’s Bowdoin College with a degree in art history and English. That firm would be the only one he’d work at to this day; in 1996, Olson became a partner at what’s now Donadio & Olson.

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Bloodhound Books on surviving and thriving as an indie publisher

telegraph.co.uk – Monday January 8, 2018

Indie crime fiction house, Bloodhound Books, is killing it right
now – and to such a degree that its doors have had to be temporarily shut for submissions.

"Our schedule is full up; we're set to release seven or eight books a month until June," says Betsy Reavley, who co-founded the company with her husband, Fred Freeman.

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A Fine Bromance: On Writing About Friendship

signature-reads.com – Friday January 5, 2018

Over the course of the six novels I’ve published, my characters have fallen in love and had their hearts broken more times than I can count. There’s a reason why readers and writers relish a good love story: when we read an ecstatic description of a heart tumbling into deranged wonder, we think: yes. An intoxicating bell of recognition (or perhaps hope) chimes deep within us. And yet, as fascinating as we may find affairs of the heart, I’m starting to feel the limitations of writing about romance.

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2018 Book Publishing Predictions - Are Indie Authors Losing their Independence?

huffingtonpost.com – Tuesday January 2, 2018

Welcome to my annual publishing predictions post where I prognosticate about the future and share my views on the state of the indie nation.

Each year around this time I polish off my imaginary crystal ball and ask it what the heck is going to happen next.

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